Boom vang, optional?

The other day I had between 2-4 passengers for fun sailing. I didn't attach the boom vang that day because it was light wind and it left things a little more open in the cockpit. Were I racing I would use it obviously but I am wondering if others find this kind of as an optional rigging item. The boom vang bridle hung up the centerboard once but short of that, there were no apparent issues. Anyone else try this or recommend against it? "If the sea did wild or wicked things, it was because she could not help them." - Hemmingway

Comments

Personally, I wouldn't recommend dispensing with the boom vang.

Personally, I wouldn't recommend dispensing with the boom vang. It's there for a purpose - to keep the boom from 'skying' and winds can change even if you start out in a light wind. The first year I had my Scot the vang came loose as I was coming into the dock (and had the boom sheet fairly far out) and the boom went up at a sharp angle and the boat heeled way over. Needless to say, I made sure the vang was more securely in place. BTW how did the vang hang up on the centerboard? R.Lewis FS367 Chin up

quote:[i]Originally posted by Richard Lewis[/i] [br]Personally,

quote:
[i]Originally posted by Richard Lewis[/i] [br]Personally, I wouldn't recommend dispensing with the boom vang. It's there for a purpose - to keep the boom from 'skying' and winds can change even if you start out in a light wind. The first year I had my Scot the vang came loose as I was coming into the dock (and had the boom sheet fairly far out) and the boom went up at a sharp angle and the boat heeled way over. Needless to say, I made sure the vang was more securely in place. BTW how did the vang hang up on the centerboard? R.Lewis FS367 Chin up
Good advice and I won't ignore it. To answer your question: With no vang attached the bridle just kind of rests on the centerboard track - the curved part that the rollers run on. The loop was aft of the rollers and when I lowered the board, the rollers came back and the bridle kind of snared it. (I hope that makes sense.) "If the sea did wild or wicked things, it was because she could not help them." - Hemmingway

Feel free to not use the boom vang when you are not racing.

Feel free to not use the boom vang when you are not racing. The Scot was originally designed with no vang and sails fine without it. Lack of a vang should not cause excessive heel by reason of the boom skying. The boom skying generally indicates a sail which is twisted off to leeward at the top which ought to depower it. Anyway it takes about 3 seconds to clip the vang back on the boom if you need it. Jay

I also didn't attach the boom vang one day sailing with 7 adults

I also didn't attach the boom vang one day sailing with 7 adults as this left a more open and comfortable cockpit as you stated. We had no destination in mind so basically sailed beam reach to beam reach which kept the boom relatively in and the boom "lift" under reasonable control with the main sheet. The winds were 10-15 mph at the time and the boat handled just fine although the leach did open a little so I'm sure we weren't as fast as we might have been. I did keep the boom vang ready to attach if needed, but never felt the need.