2nd request for info" Flying a Gennaker"

Hi : I need some info please ! With the assistance of crew ,I can successfully fly a spinnaker with a pole. Can I fly a small Gennaker on the Scot without fear of losing the mast ? Anyone out there have experience with it please advise ! Thanks , Bill

I'm not going to have an answer to your question, largely because I've never heard of a gennaker for the Scot. Is the sail built specifically for the Scot by a reputable sailmaker? Or are you using a sail from a similar boat? If it's the latter, what does the sail measure in sq. ft?

Offhand, given the Scot's sturdy construction, it might be less a question of losing a mast than it is of adversely changing the handling and helm of the boat (pure speculation on my part). So I can't help, but maybe by providing answers to the questions above, someone more knowledgeable and experienced than I am can help you out.

Kurt

Gather the information indicated by Mr. Steinbock and call the factory. They're always very helpful.
(When I visited two summers ago, there was a Scot in for some serious repairs after someone had added a bowsprit for flying something -- perhaps a gennaker. Anyway, that particular experiment didn't work out too well).

I recently saw a web page with a Flying Scot somewhere in Texas I think that was stripped down and fitted with a mast head gennaker I think. It was barreling along. You might try a google search. FS 3512

quote:[i]Originally posted by karafiath[/i]
[br]I recently saw a web page with a Flying Scot somewhere in Texas I think that was stripped down and fitted with a mast head gennaker I think. It was barreling along. You might try a google search. FS 3512

I think you are referring to this FS: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8ehVu6MG_wc

Thanks to all that responded to my need for info re: FLYING a GENNAKER. I saw the U-Tube modified Scot with the asymmetrical Sail (Gennaker ) flying from the mast head .. I don't have the hardware for that & I will not be doing that! I will stick to using the spinnaker that was designed for the Scot . Happy Holidays to All ! Bill

Bill. Sticking with the approved spinnaker is a good decision. There are anumber of things that you can do to make flying the spinnaker easier, especially if you are not racing and do not need that extra half percent on speed.
Setting the pole: Unless your crew is tall, it will be easier to set the pole on the lowest position of the mast ring if you have an adjustable ring. Otherwise you can install a second ring futher down. The crew should comfortably be able to reach the mast ring and set the pole while standing on the bottom of the boat
Larger diameter sheets: racers use the skinny 1/4 inch lines for light air. 3/8 inch lines work fine and are much easier on the hand when the wind comes up. Similarly some racers tie the sheets to the spinnakers. I use brummel hooks because I sail often with new crew
mark the sheets: This is aconvenience so that the sheets are precleated to the proper position before hoisting the chute.
Roller Furling Jib: Furl the jib and get it out of the way. In some light air situations the chute will set easier without the jib

God Luck FS 3512

Good tips. One small detail is that a roller furling jib is not legal in racing.

Have fun,

Phil Scheetz
FS 4086