Reefing the main

Good Day!

Was in a sustained 20mph wind with gust above that (purely unintentional, the weather turned once we left the marina) and desperately needed to reef the main. I read in another post about the Jiffy Reefing kit which I’m certain to get, however, how do you reef the main without the kit? Is this even possible without grommets? So I would like to pose two questions. What are some reefing techniques that can be used without the reefing kit, secondly, how hard is it to install the reefing kit?

Thank you in advanced.
Ron

Ron D. White

I'd like to hear the relative advantages of (in overpowering winds) sailing with only the Main, vs. only the jib?

Does anyone worry about the rig staying up with only the forestay, with no support from the jib haylard?

I've rigged my jib with a downhaul so I can lower it in heavy wind singlehanded, but haven't figured out how to lower the Main singlehanded in 20kt wind. Any ideas?

Alan Posner
FS#5693

quote:Originally posted by aposner
I'd like to hear the relative advantages of (in overpowering winds) sailing with only the Main, vs. only the jib?

Does anyone worry about the rig staying up with only the forestay, with no support from the jib haylard?

If you use a tight or snug rig then most of the tension is on the forestay anyway. I doubt the jib halyard adds much relieve to it, especially since the jib halyard isn't tightened much. Only the loose rig distributes the tension between the forestay and the halyard.

Our toggle below deck is never level but always pulled to the forestay side. That said I believe that the forestay can take the full tension.

Disclaimer: I'm not a boat builder or structural engineer; I'm just an opinionated person.

Claus FS5074 Ames, IA

When sailing under main alone, attach the jib halyard to the bow eye and tension it approx. the same as the forestay.
Somewhere in the reprinted articles of old Scot n Waters, Scot designer Sandy Douglas wrote that the forestay is not heavy enough alone to take the full load of a sheeted in main in a breeze, and that even when leaving a Scot on a mooring overnight, to attach the jib halyard tensioned to the bow as a safety measure.
The reprinted Scot n Water book is available from FSSA.

Hot Wheels,

Thanks for the advice. It makes sense, the only problem is, if the wind picks up enough to drop the jib while I'm singlehanding, I'd be afraid to go up to the bow to attach it.

I'd be better off if I could lower the Main, but its real hard to stay bow to wind in heavy wind, while singlehanding, even with a "tiller tamer".

Alan

Last trip out on Lake Pepin, we lost the outhaul line and decided there was too much wind. We ended up limping back on the Jib alone. It took lots of time and lots of tacking. We alsofound out the jib winches didn't work and ended up with sore hands and arms. I will be looking into a reefing kit as the newly acquired sail has the grommets installed.

Next time, the sails go up before we leave the dock.Should have guessed we were giong to have problems when the drain plug mysteriously disappeared....

FS 1385

When I first got the Scot about 25 years ago I roller furled the main one time in Florida in heavy air. The boom vang comes off. The center block from the boom has to be removed. Roll the sail on the boom. The main now comes off the end of the boom and is a nuisance. However this is the way that Sandy originally designed the boat.. The problem with this way of reefing is that you get a horribly baggy main and no vang control.