Thinking about buying a used FS

First a little background about myself...I'm 24 work as a yacht designer at a small yacht design firm...Looking to buy my first boat. My parents owned a Hobie Getaway and I sailed it by myself nearly everyday in the summer for 3 years. After college I moved to NYC and I haven't really sailed a lot since. Now I moved to Farmingdale Long Island and I royally miss sailing!!! I'm looking for a boat to sail mostly single handed on the Great South Bay, Long Island, but sometimes with a couple people, mainly my girlfriend. So it has to be fun and easy to sail alone, but not a dog with 2 to 3 people on board. I'm used to the Hobie Cat so I'm definitely looking for a performance boat, but something more laid back then say a skiff. Ideally I'd like to dry sail the boat and found a local "yacht club" if you want to call it that that is pretty inexpensive $130 for summer dry storage and $120 for winter dry storage, or $30 a foot for in water storage. The yacht club has a small ramp but I don't want to put a trailer hitch on my car (Mazda3)... maybe I could find a way to get it on the trailer, and pull it up the ramp without a car? It's also located at the inland end of a canal which is about .2 miles long and 150 feet wide at the narrowest point. Ideally I'd like to sail out of the canal which I'm confident I can do. The boat has to be very low maintenance and very cheap to own when used often...anyway does it sound like I'm on the right track towards picking the right boat? Other boats I've considered is the Laser (two people its a downer) Vanguard 15, and another hobie cat but I'd kind of like to sit in the boat now on it. The scot is really pushing the larger end of what I'm looking for though, seems like it'll be difficult to move around on land by myself.

Comments

One thing I forgot to mention, and the edit button doesn't appea

One thing I forgot to mention, and the edit button doesn't appear to be working is that I don't plan on doing any racing, but that could change. I really just enjoy going out for a performance daysail (all day)

Just some thoughts.

Just some thoughts. The other boats you mention will be wet boats, The Scot on nice days is not. No bathing suit required. You sit on the other boats, you pretty much sit in the Scot. You can have a friend launch the boat or the club may have a crane which is very easy. Better to dry sail than leave it in the water even if cost is not an objective. The Scot can sail with one to eight people. Check out the Scot web site. You may want to race one day and it is a popular small one design boat. If you do decide to trailer it a small car can tow it real easy. It is easy to move around on land by yourself. Dave

Thanks Dave, Like the dry boat concept.

Thanks Dave, Like the dry boat concept...I know it's not going to be very dry on windy days, but for light wind days it will be which is great to extent the season a little more...or on those typical 75 degree days...I know when sailing the Hobie anything under 80 degrees and I needed a wet suit due to sitting in the shade behind the sail soaking wet. (i went to college in Georgia and now get cold easily) The yacht club does have a crane so I should be able to use that. How is it going to be single handing? I weigh 165lb and I'm very athletic. The boat+trailer weight is right at the limit of what mazda says my car can tow...so for that one time I need to tow it i'll probably borrow someone truck...moving it around long island i can probably just sail it to where it needs to go.

We have several sailors at our club here in Eustis Florida that

We have several sailors at our club here in Eustis Florida that single hand "race" all the time. They also fly the spinnaker. But you do not need to fly the spinnaker. So it is very possible. I have seen some folks install roller furling jibs. I think there is a boat listed on this site that has one, however it is a newer boat. You pretty much can sit and steer the boat from the middle. So your sailing process may be as follows: Others may have other ideas. before leaving the dock have all sails connected and ready to raise. At the dock lower rudder and center board, hoist the main while facing into the wind. Sail away from the dock, downwind is easy. Then hoist the jib without it cleated. Sit down, trim the jib, main and sail away. Tacking, Release the jib, tack the boat and main, them trim the jib. Most of the sailing as a cruiser will probably be reaches so don't over trim. You can always go out with someone and have them do nothing while you practice. Ask for some help before you hoist with a crane, it is easy but there are certain things you need to know. All the information is on the Flying Scot sites.

You are on the right track, and if you can launch with a hoist a

You are on the right track, and if you can launch with a hoist and the trailer area is pretty level (like the rest of Long Island) you will not need to tow it once its there. Dry sailing tends to keep the boat clean and is less maintanance. The comfort level for single-handing a Scot is about up to the point where the boat goes from "dry" to "wet". If there is enough wind and chop to make the water splash up over the bow, that is also the wind where a crew becomes extra helpful. Three reasons: 1 They can hike to keep the boat flat 2 They can help manage the jib and spinnaker making you faster (more fun) with two than one. 3 The water that splashes off the bow, when going to weather tends to come down about where the crew sits on the rail. This has the effect of keeping the skipper dry(er). It's a very nice thing for the crew to do. Buy them lunch. Welcome to the Scot class, Phil Scheetz FS 4086

Phil Scheetz

FS 4086

Fleet 163, Nockamixon Sail Club

You are on the right track, and if you can launch with a hoist a

You are on the right track, and if you can launch with a hoist and the trailer area is pretty level (like the rest of Long Island) you will not need to tow it once its there. Dry sailing tends to keep the boat clean and is less maintanance. The comfort level for single-handing a Scot is about up to the point where the boat goes from "dry" to "wet". If there is enough wind and chop to make the water splash up over the bow, that is also the wind where a crew becomes extra helpful. Three reasons: 1 They can hike to keep the boat flat 2 They can help manage the jib and spinnaker making you faster (more fun) with two than one. 3 The water that splashes off the bow, when going to weather tends to come down about where the crew sits on the rail. This has the effect of keeping the skipper dry(er). It's a very nice thing for the crew to do. Buy them lunch. Welcome to the Scot class, Phil Scheetz FS 4086

Phil Scheetz

FS 4086

Fleet 163, Nockamixon Sail Club

Ha, great I experience the dry effect on the Hobie Cat my dad wh

Ha, great I experience the dry effect on the Hobie Cat my dad who is a pretty big guy sit in front of me and kept me very dry while he got soaked! Ah new developments, I talked to my boss about what boat I should get, he said oh thats funny I'm in the market for a boat with the same qualities, turns out the office might buy a boat for everyone (3 people small office) to use....He's interested in a Lightning but I have a feeling we're just going to buy a used boat similar to a Lightning or Flying Scot thats located locally.

I bought into a Scot when my wife and I were twenty nine.

I bought into a Scot when my wife and I were twenty nine. The reason that we like it was primarily the racing seem seemed to be flourishing. I also like that it seemed really easy to maintain because of the one design heritage and FS Inc provides great support. I sailed Lasers in HS and after college we sailed an O'Day Day Sailer but that fleet has all completely lost its way. You can do almost anything that you want so people were doing all sorts of crazy modifications. On top of that new DS is not the same as an old DS. They changed the mold several times over since the original attempting to modernize the boat. I missed the true strict one design of the laser. If something broke call an 800 number and it will come in a few days. I do that now with Flying Scot. Years ago I broke my FS rudder on a Sunday, called the builder Monday, and had the replacement Wednesday. Now that I have two young children I am super happy with the choice. I can take the kids on the boat myself on light days because it is so stable. I even casually race with them. On super windy days when the other fleets wimp out everyone piles onto the Scots. We even fly the chute for extra thrills. Our lake is pretty small so a capsize would not be the end of the world.

Thanks for the info, seems like the flying scot is a great choic

Thanks for the info, seems like the flying scot is a great choice, if the office doesn't buy a boat I think I'll sink some money into one.

For a skilled sailor, singlehanding a Scot, even in a brisk bree

For a skilled sailor, singlehanding a Scot, even in a brisk breeze, is pretty easy. As long as you don't use the chute. You will find you need a vehicle to ramp launch it. It's too heavy to manhandle up and down a ramp. You can't go wrong with a Scot, especially if you have a girlfriend who likes to sail but wants to be comfortable (e.g. hates Lasers and Hobie Cats). Jay Lott Fs 5698

I am using my FS on a lake where we don't have a dock.

I am using my FS on a lake where we don't have a dock. I bought a two part ramp with a winch that lies partly in the water. It is working really well except we have to wade into the water to launch and return. The rudder lift and adjustable height centerboard are terrific!