trailer winch capacity

My trailer winch is all rusted and I want to replace it. Does anyone know what is the standard winch capacity on Scot trailers? I have a TeeNee, but I don't think the trailer brand matters. Is 1400lbs enough, too much? Thanks, Mario

Comments

Mario, Flying Scot Inc.

Mario, Flying Scot Inc. will know the answer. Call them at 800-864-7208. Harry and karen are here in New Orleans for the Mid-winters. Ask Dee to find out from Don in the shop. Or wait until neext week when harry is back in the office. FS Inc. very likely has the part you need for your Tee Nee trailer. Hank Sykes FSSA Forum editor

quote:[i]Originally posted by fssaeditor[/i] [br]Mario, Flying

quote:
[i]Originally posted by fssaeditor[/i] [br]Mario, Flying Scot Inc. will know the answer. Call them at 800-864-7208. Harry and karen are here in New Orleans for the Mid-winters. Ask Dee to find out from Don in the shop. Or wait until neext week when harry is back in the office. FS Inc. very likely has the part you need for your Tee Nee trailer. Hank Sykes FSSA Forum editor
Thanks Hank, I called them last summer about the spring sizes for the same trailer and they didn't know, so I just didn't think of them this time. I'll give them a try next week. I need to buy couple others things anyway. [:p]

I think 1400 lb winch capacity is just fine for the Scot as the

I think 1400 lb winch capacity is just fine for the Scot as the actual pull on the rope will be much less, even when pulling up a steep ramp. The issue is not really winch capacity but how much force you will have on the winch handle. Assume that the steepest ramp is 15 degrees and the Scott weighs 900 lb with your lunch and other gear. Then the rope tension needed assuming no friction between hull and trailer is 241 lb. The max friction if you have only carpeted bunk support is about 360 lbs assuming a friction coefficient of 0.4 . Thus the max rope pull should be about 501 lbs, much less if you have well rolling roller support. The real question is how much force is on the winch handle. The gear ratio on a winch is commonly 3 or 4 depending on the respective number of teeth on the two gears, but that is only part of the mechanical advantage. The other part is the relationship between the winch handle length and the effective radius of the pulling line on the drum. With a 10 inch winch handle and an approximately 1 inch effective radius on the drum you get a mechanical advantage of 10 which as the rope turns on the drum builds to perhaps 3 inches decreasesthe advantage to 3.33 for an overall mechanical advantage with a 4:1 gear set of 40 decreasing to 12 as the boat is pulled up. Initially as the boat is in the water the effort needed to pull the boat is low since it has not yet assumed the final angle of the trailer. It is the last two feet when your mechanical advantage is down to the 12 range when there is a struggle to get the boat on the trailer. However at this point the boat is usually well enough on the trailer to allow the car to pull the boat a short distance to a level spot where the boat can be snuggged into place on the trailer and where the mast can be taken down easily if needed. FS 3512

quote:[i]Originally posted by karafiath[/i] [br]I think 1400 lb

quote:
[i]Originally posted by karafiath[/i] [br]I think 1400 lb winch capacity is just fine for the Scot as the actual pull on the rope will be much less, even when pulling up a steep ramp. The issue is not really winch capacity but how much force you will have on the winch handle. Assume that the steepest ramp is 15 degrees and the Scott weighs 900 lb with your lunch and other gear. Then the rope tension needed assuming no friction between hull and trailer is 241 lb. The max friction if you have only carpeted bunk support is about 360 lbs assuming a friction coefficient of 0.4 . Thus the max rope pull should be about 501 lbs, much less if you have well rolling roller support. The real question is how much force is on the winch handle. The gear ratio on a winch is commonly 3 or 4 depending on the respective number of teeth on the two gears, but that is only part of the mechanical advantage. The other part is the relationship between the winch handle length and the effective radius of the pulling line on the drum. With a 10 inch winch handle and an approximately 1 inch effective radius on the drum you get a mechanical advantage of 10 which as the rope turns on the drum builds to perhaps 3 inches decreasesthe advantage to 3.33 for an overall mechanical advantage with a 4:1 gear set of 40 decreasing to 12 as the boat is pulled up. Initially as the boat is in the water the effort needed to pull the boat is low since it has not yet assumed the final angle of the trailer. It is the last two feet when your mechanical advantage is down to the 12 range when there is a struggle to get the boat on the trailer. However at this point the boat is usually well enough on the trailer to allow the car to pull the boat a short distance to a level spot where the boat can be snuggged into place on the trailer and where the mast can be taken down easily if needed. FS 3512
Wow, almost too much details to handle by my brain... I'll look for a winch in a neighborhood of 1400lb capacity . Thank you.