Slowing Down

What are the best ways to slow a Scot down? I frequently find that I would like to slow down a little at the start and when in the vicinity of other boats. Can anyone help me with this?

Comments

These methods, alone or in combination, can help slow you down:

These methods, alone or in combination, can help slow you down: 1. Luff one or both sails. I find it's better to luff the jib first, then the main if you need to slow more (because the jib can be instantly trimmed back in whereas the main might need a few seconds to come back in) 2. Violent turns using a lot of rudder 3. (If you are close hauled or above) back the jib or the main. Especially radically pushing the boom forward to back the main, while at the same time moving the tiller to windward (to counteract the force of the backed main, which will tend to head you even more to windward). This can stop you dead almost right away if you need to do that; but then you can trim in relatively quickly and accelerate on the same close hauled course if necessary. 4. Heel to windward. Especially helpful when luffing above close hauled. It will tend to make the boat want to fall off so then you use rudder to counteract that, which slows you further. Except when the wind is very light, don't be afraid to maneuver radically and slow down / speed up to get the starting position you need. Hope this helps. J. Lott FS 5698

how about at the leeward mark? say you just miss getting an ove

how about at the leeward mark? say you just miss getting an overlap - - how do you slow so as not to run up on a transom ahead during the rounding? rb

randy blough, FS1954