Tacktick micro compass

I am interested in purchasing a micro tacktick. I currently use a round globe compass with lubber lines and have found it to be invaluable in many cases. I have been writing compass heading on the combing of the boat and have been doing simple math in my head as I sail. I also struggle with making accurate readings as the boat bounces along, and the lines are pretty close together. This is distracting, and prevents me from having my head out of the boat as much as it should be. Never having used a tacktick, could someone explain what it will do for me? Is it really worth the expensed? Do some consider it cheating, and if so why? Do you think it will become illegal in the FS class? Thanks in advance for any input John FS3873

Comments

Hello John, The TickTack Micro compass is entirely legal with

Hello John, The TickTack Micro compass is entirely legal within the Flying Scot class. I have used the Ticktack compass for four years now, and like it very much. There are several big advantages: 1. The numbers are large and easy for both skipper and crew to see. There are two displays making it easy to view from either the port or starboard side of the boat. 2. There is a nifty countdown timer. Again, the numbers are easy for everyone to see, and the time may be adjusted easily to synchronize with the race committee, should you miss the exact starting moment of the countdown. There are three modes: compass, tactics, and timer. Compass mode gives you the same headings as a regular compass. This heading shows in both displays on the Micro. Timer mode counts down from whatever value you set (usually five). when the timer reaches zero, the micro shifts automatically to compass mode. However, the timer starts tracking your elapsed time, should you ever need switch back to timer mode to check it. The third mode, tactical, attempts to eliminate the in-head calculations you mention. You set the tactics mode for the tacking angle you expect. The default is 90 degrees. For that tacking angle, the number you see in tactics mode is different in the two displays. For a given display the number will always be 45 degrees varied toward the side of the boat on which you are sitting. So, if your compass heading on starboard is zero, the starboard display in tactics mode will display 45. When you tack onto port and you compass heading is 90, the port-side display will read 45. So, theorecitally, when tacking upwind, you can focus on the one number, and are assisted in judging windshifts should that number change. The "45" number changes only if you are headed differently by five degrees or more, So, if on starboard, if the number decreases to 40 and the wind is steady, you can easily judge that you have been headed and tack. The number of degrees before the "tactics" number changes may be adjusted to suit preferences. With experience I have stopped using the tactics mode, as that "one number" can be elusive depending on wind conditions. I have reverted to doing the in-head calculations. So, for me, the two advantages I mentioned above are what I get, but that's plenty. I suppose If I were less lazy, I could get out to the course earlier, figure what the tacking angle of the day was, and set that value. (That angle would last, of course, until wind velocity changed significantly.)[:D] Turning the compass on and off is important for you and your crew to know. This is especially true when restarting a race after a general recall, or other times when you need to reset the timer. FSSA Forum editor

I agree with all that Randy stated above, having used 2 differen

I agree with all that Randy stated above, having used 2 different Tackticks over the years on my 2 Scots. We only use the straight heading mode now, after experimenting in the past. A new crew made a good point which I pass along: Don't use the timer in the Tacktick as you need the compass mode during the pre-start sequence to know what the wind is doing in the last few minutes to the start. He said "use that good wristwatch timer you have for timing the start" or have a crewmember read the time off a watch. Shoot the wind at least twice in the start sequence, usually during slow tacks while maneuvering. One needs to know whether starboard tack is lifted or headed right after the gun, assuming the wind is oscillating. This has helped towards getting us to the correct end of the start line and going in the correct direction right off the line. Switching the Tacktick mode back & forth between timer & compass modes can be done, but has to be remembered. Just leaving it in compass works better. One other thing: Polarized sunglasses can make the Tacktick screen hard to see, as with other LCD screens on used other boats like GPS, AIS, radar, etc. This has become less of an issue with the Micro screens being angled.

Only the micro or basic TackTick is class legal.

Only the micro or basic TackTick is class legal. They are very nice, but I bought one most of all for its BIG numbers on the display! [:D] -Michael www.FlyingScotSouth.com
quote:
[i]Originally posted by johncallis[/i] [br]I am interested in purchasing a micro tacktick. I currently use a round globe compass with lubber lines and have found it to be invaluable in many cases. I have been writing compass heading on the combing of the boat and have been doing simple math in my head as I sail. I also struggle with making accurate readings as the boat bounces along, and the lines are pretty close together. This is distracting, and prevents me from having my head out of the boat as much as it should be. Never having used a tacktick, could someone explain what it will do for me? Is it really worth the expensed? Do some consider it cheating, and if so why? Do you think it will become illegal in the FS class? Thanks in advance for any input John FS3873
Michael Mittman FS# 5804, Fleet 23 Corinthian Sailing Club White Rock Lake Dallas, TX

Michael Mittman

FS 5804, Fleet 23

Corinthian Sailing Club

White Rock Lake, Dallas, TX, USA