Old Forum link, Scot vs. Lighting

I'm trying to access the old Forum to read the Lightning vs. Scot thread from Oct. 11, 2002, but can't find a link to the Old Forum. Help! Also, it would be interesting to hear of any recent opinions comparing the performance of Scots and Lightnings.

Comments

quote:[i]Originally posted by ScotSailor[/i] [br]I'm trying to

quote:
[i]Originally posted by ScotSailor[/i] [br]I'm trying to access the old Forum to read the Lightning vs. Scot thread from Oct. 11, 2002, but can't find a link to the Old Forum. Help!
Check out the last post of the Flying Scot Manual or Book topic.

Claus FS5074 Ames, IA

The old forum used to be here http://www.

The old forum used to be here http://www.fssa.com/fsforum/, but it doesn't appear to be active anymore.

Visited the Wayback Machine but when I tried to retrieve posting

Visited the Wayback Machine but when I tried to retrieve postings from 2002 I got the "Int. Exp. cannot display the webpage" message. The performance of Lightnings campared to Scots would seem to be an interesting topic but apparently it hasn't been addressed in the last few years. I'll try it in the Racing Forum and see what happens.

I recently updated the Snitz forum level.

I recently updated the Snitz forum level. In the process I deleted the old forum files. However, I do have them archived if there are many of you who would like them available. FSSA Forum editor

I would definately vote for restoring the Old Forum.

I would definately vote for restoring the Old Forum. I have referred to it quite often. Thanks Bonny & Doug Smith FS381

Bill, here is the whole thread from the old forum: quote: Flyi

Bill, here is the whole thread from the old forum:
quote:
Flying Scot From: Chris Date: 11 Oct 2002 Time: 09:43:23 -0400 Comments I am a somewhat experienced sailor, have been for the last few years sailing a O'Day 192. As I have 2 small girls (1 year and 3 1/2 yrs and hope to get them both out on the water sailing) I don't get out much, as the saying goes and the prices for docking in Southern Jersey are not worth my while. How long does it take for a single person to rig the FS? I am interested in a fast boat that points well (the O'Day does not, and is slow) and would be interested in taking the daysailer out on the open ocean (not far out, mind you, but far enough to sail along the southern New Jersey coast. How does it do in heavy winds, and very light winds? Thanks.
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Re: Flying Scot From: Greg Bennett, Flying Scot #1087 Date: 11 Oct 2002 Time: 09:59:11 -0400 Comments Chris, It takes me about 25 minutes to rig and launch my Flying Scot myself. That includes the running rigging for the spinnaker and also bending on the main and jib before launching the boat. Take off 5 minutes if you don't use the spinnaker. Take off a few more minutes if you have help that also knows how to rig the boat. The help could hang the rudder, install the tiller, tie on dock lines for launching, etc. I've singlehanded my boat in everything from 0 to 20 with gusts over 20. Opinions vary, but I think the Flying Scot is a handful for one person if the wind gets to more than about 12 mph, but also quite a ride in those conditions. The boat is not easy to turn over- just keep one hand on the mainsheet and plan your tacks. In light winds- under 5 mph- mt Flying Scot is slow compared to the boats I race against, but that could be a problem with the skipper. I sail on protected inland waters, so I have no experience with anything in the open ocean. Greg
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Re: Flying Scot From: Mario G. Date: 15 Oct 2002 Time: 12:37:02 -0400 Comments Who do you race against? I am planning to buy a sailboat next spring and I am deliberating between a Flying Scot and Lightning, so maybe you can give me some hints from your experience. Thanks, Mario
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Scots and Lightnings, similar but very different. From: EricG Date: 15 Oct 2002 Time: 22:21:56 -0400 Comments The Scot and Lightning are both 19 ft long, and the Portsmoth Number, which is a measure of how fast the boats are is very similar, with the Lightning a bit faster. The weight is also very similar. The designs have evolved into very different boats. The Lightning is now primarily a racer. The Scot is still a family cruiser/racer. Lightnings I've seen are fairly complex boats, with lots of 'go fast' adjustments which allow a racer to get the most out of the boat. In racing form, they are likely twice the cost of the Scot. The Scot is a tightly regulated class which keeps the 'go fasts' to a minimum. Design inovation is not likely to be permited. As a result, old Scots are very much competitive with new, and owners are not forced to buy up when a new material or rig is developed. Also the Scot is much more comfortable for those 'family' type outings when you want to go sailing with a group. I think it is rated for 8 adults, and the cockpit is comfortable with that many aboard. It is also very stable, which gives confidence to my wife and son who are learning sailing. The seats are really nice for a dingy. And the boat is pretty fast, and very respectable against ANY sailboat. I would find out what one design boat(s) is being raced in your area, if racing is your objective. Then you will know if you will have any boats to race against. If there is a Scot fleet anywhere nearby, then I would definitely consider the Scot as a racer. If you are fairly new to racing, hook up with a one design class in your area and see if someone needs crew. It is the fastest way to learn. Then you can apply that knowledge to your own boat.
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Re: Scots and Lightnings, similar but very different. From: Mario G. Date: 16 Oct 2002 Time: 09:19:33 -0400 Comments Thanks for your quick reply. In my area (NJ) both classes are well represented, so I will be able to get some nice racing either way. I wish I could get a more racing oriented boat since racing is what I want to do. I like to do some hiking which Scot doesn't have. But I have to think about my crew who will be basically my family. I have 2 daughters 6 and 9 and so thinking realisticly Flying Scot is probably a better choice. Lightning may simply be a little too much for my little crew at this momement. On the other hand they will be much bigger in couple of years... Do you know by any chance if crew of 3 is required on lightnings. All pictures I have seen show 3 people in boats. I could not find anything specific in class rules. I know Flying Scot is flexible in this and can be sailed with 2 or 3 at regattas. Thanks for your time.
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How about your wife? Is she a sailor? From: EricG Date: 22 Oct 2002 Time: 00:24:08 -0400 Comments I'm speculating here since I don't really know anything about you. A Lightning seems too much for your forseeable future, if you are planning on bringing your daughters as crew. Lucky for you though, there is a lot of very competitive Flying Scots in the Tom's River area. They should keep you busy for the next 10yrs or so. Meantime, go out a few times as crew, or better yet sign on as regular crew for both Scots and Lightnings. You'll get all the sailing you can stand, and will learn a lot about racing strategy, and how to get the most out of your boat. Break the girls in at their own pace. They'll hate you soon enough, be carefull not to be overly demanding early. You and they want to have fun. Then see if they are up to making a race fun too! It really seems to me that the Scot would be a much better choice for you at this time. Cheaper, simpler to rig and sail, yet a good one design fleet in your area. And they are just as fast as the Lightning. I think you'll enjoy the family aspect of the boat. I've even got my wife driving most of the time, and she enjoys it.
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Re: How about your wife? Is she a sailor? From: Mario G Date: 22 Oct 2002 Time: 12:16:03 -0400 Comments Thanks for all your comments. My wife is a beginner just like my daughters. Actually my older daugther sailed an Optimist this summer in junior program and she loved it. This convinced me that it is time to get a sailboat. I used to sail an OK Dinghy which is a singlehanded boat popular in Europe and similar in size to Laser so I should be ok. Again thanks for all your advice and if you are in NJ than maybe I'll see you on the water one day next year. Toms River is a little too far for me, but I have been to a club in Red Bank and that's where I think I will hook up. Mario
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Re: How about your wife? Is she a sailor? From: Tom P Date: 28 Dec 2002 Time: 00:15:09 -0500 Comments I took lessons at Monmouth Boat Club last summer -- Tom V was a wonderful, patient instructor. MBC teaches on a Lightning, but Tom recommended the Scot if I want to take the wife and children along. I enjoyed the course so much, my wife gave me another 8 hours for Christmas! I'm actually hoping to purchase a Scot and see if Tom will teach me on my boat. The Atlantic City show is coming up in about two weeks, so I'm hoping to speak to the Scot crew -- they've been great on the phone and through e-mail. The tape and materials they sent made me only more excited to purchase the Scot. Best of luck in the decision. I, too, hope to join MBC this spring.
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Re: Scots and Lightnings, similar but very different. From: todbrenner Date: 16 Oct 2002 Time: 19:44:45 -0400 Comments Eric G is right on the money. A lightning is pretty much just for racing it is a very uncomfortable cruising/family boat. I own a Scot and have crewed on a Lightning for racing. A lightning is too complicated and cramped to be a good family cruiser. You can go just as fast in a Scot. Three people in a Lightning is optimal due to the complexity of the boat. The front person handles jib trim, spinnaker take-down, cunningham and barberhaul. The middle crew handles jib and main halyards, outhaul, vang, centerboard, traveller and Spinnaker trim. The Skipper handles steering, and spinnaker halyard and picks up any tasks that the middle crew cannot get to.
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Re: Scots and Lightnings, similar but very different. From: Allan Terhune- Date: 24 Oct 2002 Time: 12:08:40 -0400 Comments I have a Lightning now and owned a scot for 10 years leading up to now. A lightning is definately faster than a scot, and it is more comlicated for sure. Lightnings are great boats, they sail well and there are many great people in the class. This is also true for the scot. I would agree that with where you are right now I would sail a scot. It is definately more crew friendly for beginners and you will enjoy it. Both Monmouth BC and Toms River have great fleets. If you need contacts at either place let me know. Allan Terhune Jr. Lightning #14924 Old SCot #3869 and 3524
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Re: Flying Scot From: Greg Bennett, Flying Dcot #1087 Date: 11 Oct 2002 Time: 10:08:49 -0400 Comments ...I forgot to mention that the rigging time also includes stepping the mast.


Claus FS5074 Ames, IA

Claus, Thank you for finding that old thread comparing Ligh

Claus, Thank you for finding that old thread comparing Lightnings and Scots. It was interesting, but I'm more concerned with how well Scots and Lightnings could race together in situations where there sometimes are too few of either one class or the other to get enough boats together for a good start. On small lakes with small fleets, this can be a real problem which might be alleviated by combining the two. Is this a really dumb idea? I hope to find out by expanding in this in Racers' rap. Bill