dropping the jib.

What is the "best" way to handle the jib when it needs to be dropped for whatever reason? I like to drop the jib and sail in on the main sail only sometimes. On my old Lightning, I had an elastic cord in the midline that I would tuck the jib under until docking. I've not found new ideas or any discussions on handling the dropped jib. Is the elastic cord the "way to go" or are there better ways to handle this? I don't really want to go to jib furling. Thanks in advance for your ideas. Rog Klettke

Comments

I just douse it there and run up, connect the halyard to the bot

I just douse it there and run up, connect the halyard to the bottom and take it off but I like that elastic cord idea. Main sailing alone is not great with this boat in stronger winds, I find. "If the sea did wild or wicked things, it was because she could not help them." - Hemmingway

When I douse my jib, at the dock or on the water, I leave the ji

When I douse my jib, at the dock or on the water, I leave the jib halyard attached to the head. I hook a bungee to the bow eye, loop it over the to snap of the sail between the halyard and forestay, and then hook the other end to the bow eye. Then I snug up the halyard a bit. I find that simply looping a bungee over the body of the sail isn't as secure, but by capturing the head of the sail, it stays in place. Make sense? It's early. Kurt

Kurt Steinbock

FS 3879

quote:[i]Originally posted by Kurt Steinbock[/i] [br]When I dou

quote:
[i]Originally posted by Kurt Steinbock[/i] [br]When I douse my jib, at the dock or on the water, I leave the jib halyard attached to the head. I hook a bungee to the bow eye, loop it over the to snap of the sail between the halyard and forestay, and then hook the other end to the bow eye. Then I snug up the halyard a bit. I find that simply looping a bungee over the body of the sail isn't as secure, but by capturing the head of the sail, it stays in place. Make sense? It's early. Kurt
Makes perfect sense. And I guess a shorter bungee from the bow eye to the shackle on the halyard would do the same thing. "If the sea did wild or wicked things, it was because she could not help them." - Hemmingway

My spinnaker halyard topping lift is connected with shockcord, w

My spinnaker halyard topping lift is connected with shockcord, which is routed through a pulley at the base of the mast, and then brought forward and connected to the boweye. The secondary use of the shockcord is to tuck the jib under when I don't want it to blow around. This works very good. I have also experimnented with a jib downhaul this year, which has really worked out well. When I singlehand, this system lets me lower the jib easier and safer, especially when the winds increase. A combination of the shockcord and the jib downhaul keeps the jib really secure.

Thanks to all.

Thanks to all. I'm trying the methods mentioned. This past weekend, I hooked a small block to the bull nose/bow eye and rigged a quick jib downhaul as bigpapaporsche mentioned. The fore deck was pretty wet by the time I was coming in, and the down haul really worked well. I didn't have to leave the cockpit and quickly was able to get the jib down with a significant wind blowing. Cleating the jib down haul with my spinnaker cleat secured the jib very well, probably similar to using the bungee to hold the head down. I used 1/4 inch line so by keeping it snug with the spinnaker cleat while the jib was up, the line didn't seem to interfer with sailing. I also tucked the body of the jib under a shock cord after taking it down, but this may not be necessary. I liked the system. Obviously if I continue to like the system, I'll have to put in another cleat so I could still use my spinnaker. Thanks again. Rog Klettke

quote:[i]Originally posted by Rog Klettke[/i] [br]Thanks to all

quote:
[i]Originally posted by Rog Klettke[/i] [br]Thanks to all. I'm trying the methods mentioned. This past weekend, I hooked a small block to the bull nose/bow eye and rigged a quick jib downhaul as bigpapaporsche mentioned. The fore deck was pretty wet by the time I was coming in, and the down haul really worked well. I didn't have to leave the cockpit and quickly was able to get the jib down with a significant wind blowing. Cleating the jib down haul with my spinnaker cleat secured the jib very well, probably similar to using the bungee to hold the head down. I used 1/4 inch line so by keeping it snug with the spinnaker cleat while the jib was up, the line didn't seem to interfer with sailing. I also tucked the body of the jib under a shock cord after taking it down, but this may not be necessary. I liked the system. Obviously if I continue to like the system, I'll have to put in another cleat so I could still use my spinnaker. Thanks again. Rog Klettke
Sounds like a good idea esp. when single-handling. Did you attach the downhaul to the jib head or jib halyard shackle so when the jib was up, it ran along side the forestay? I wonder if you could keep this line inside the jib snaps to keep it more secure. "If the sea did wild or wicked things, it was because she could not help them." - Hemmingway

I am happy you tried, and liked, the Jib Downhaul on your Flying

I am happy you tried, and liked, the Jib Downhaul on your Flying Scot. I have enjoyed it! I wonder if it is class legal? I have also experimented using it when flying the Spinnaker. In some wind conditions the jib can be of little or no use, and even block the wind from getting to the Spinnaker in light air. I used 1/8 or 3/16 line, and snapped it in every other snap on the jib. However, I recommend even fewer snaps, because the friction gets to much using every other snap. Additionally, I want to add a Take-up-Reel to better manage the line when the jib is down.

I found that the downhaul running through the snaps made for too

I found that the downhaul running through the snaps made for too much friction so it runs free and only goes through a 'floating' ring about half ways up the jib stay. I also put the block below deck and run the line back through the cuddy space to a cleat on the side of the tabernacle. Just one less line to trip over when you're up there on the foredeck. R.Lewis FS 367 Chin up

quote:[i]Originally posted by Richard Lewis[/i] [br]I found tha

quote:
[i]Originally posted by Richard Lewis[/i] [br]I found that the downhaul running through the snaps made for too much friction so it runs free and only goes through a 'floating' ring about half ways up the jib stay. I also put the block below deck and run the line back through the cuddy space to a cleat on the side of the tabernacle. Just one less line to trip over when you're up there on the foredeck. R.Lewis FS 367 Chin up
Through what hole does this downhaul line come on your boat, the one that is there on the bow fitting for the jib or did you put another to get it below deck? I think I am going to rig one of these downhauls up this weekend and I am going to use the spare cleat that I have which I removed from the base of my mast. "If the sea did wild or wicked things, it was because she could not help them." - Hemmingway

The line goes through the existing hole in the bow and I put a s

The line goes through the existing hole in the bow and I put a small block in place just below that to run the line through. R.Lewis FS367 Chin up

Re:JHS's question.

Re:JHS's question. I had attached the downhaul to the jib halyard shackle, but I suspect it would have worked very similarly attached to the jib head also. I like Richard Lewis's idea of feeding the downhaul line thru the existing deck hole (for the jib tack wire, I assume)and putting a small block beneath the deck. This would keep the deck and nose of boat cleaner. I'm going to play with this variation also when I get a chance. This would allow me to cleat the downhaul line on one of my wooden cleats on the side of the ?tabernacle? (Is this what you call the wooden support structure beneath the mast step?) I don't know what those cleats are otherwise used for anyway! Otherwise, I could always add a different cleat there. Thanks again everyone. Rog Klettke

quote:[i]Originally posted by Rog Klettke[/i] [br]Re:JHS's ques

quote:
[i]Originally posted by Rog Klettke[/i] [br]Re:JHS's question. I had attached the downhaul to the jib halyard shackle, but I suspect it would have worked very similarly attached to the jib head also. I like Richard Lewis's idea of feeding the downhaul line thru the existing deck hole (for the jib tack wire, I assume)and putting a small block beneath the deck. This would keep the deck and nose of boat cleaner. I'm going to play with this variation also when I get a chance. This would allow me to cleat the downhaul line on one of my wooden cleats on the side of the ?tabernacle? (Is this what you call the wooden support structure beneath the mast step?) I don't know what those cleats are otherwise used for anyway! Otherwise, I could always add a different cleat there. Thanks again everyone. Rog Klettke
Rog - those cleats are for general cleatage and also for when you step the mast - I use the centerboard line, tie off to jib halyard (through bow eye) and then secure to both of them and hoist away - this is depicted on the Flying Scot website. I think they'd work well for the jib downhaul too. "If the sea did wild or wicked things, it was because she could not help them." - Hemmingway

I forgot to mention that I also have an eye pad mounted on the t

I forgot to mention that I also have an eye pad mounted on the tabernacle in line with the cleat to keep the down haul line from dropping down on the deck, and a small plastic towel hook (mounted on the starboard storage tub) to hold the line when not in use. R.Lewis FS367 Chin up

I may be dense, but why do you have to cleat the downhaul? It s

I may be dense, but why do you have to cleat the downhaul? It seems that gravity and friction would keep the jib down. It seems that in a race, you would want to crank the jib back up quickly without having to uncleat. I have not seen a comment on whether this is class legal. It is not included in the list of permitted systems. Phil Scheetz FS 4086

Phil Scheetz

FS 4086

Fleet 163, Nockamixon Sail Club

Since I don't race it doesn't matter (to me) if it is class lega

Since I don't race it doesn't matter (to me) if it is class legal or not and there is always plenty of time to uncleat and pull the jib up or down. And the only reason I cleat the downhaul (whether the jib is up or down) is to keep the lines neat. R.Lewis FS367 Chin up

Richard Lewis (and anyone else who's run the downhaul through th

Richard Lewis (and anyone else who's run the downhaul through the existing deck hole) - what kind of block did you use beneath the deck? I have a glassed-in block of wood below deck behind the bow plate. Did you attach the block to the wood? Thanks!

Mark FS 1573

I used the smallest Harken bullet block (098 I think) which woul

I used the smallest Harken bullet block (098 I think) which would take the line and attached it to the piece of wood in the the bow that you mentioned. R.Lewis FS367 Chin up

Thank you.

Thank you.

Mark FS 1573