rowing

Has anyone ever rigged a scot with oarloks and rowed? I imagine scull oars would be long enough. Has anyone heard of or tried this? Dan

Comments

Not to be a wise-guy, but it seems somehow wrong to put oarlocks

Not to be a wise-guy, but it seems somehow wrong to put oarlocks on. The weight of the boat would give you a nice workout, and you would have to fashion a seat of some sort. The flat side decks would make it tricky, you would need long oars to get to the water without hitting the deck. The boat seems ideally suited for sailing, however... Phil Scheetz FS 4086

Phil Scheetz

FS 4086

Fleet 163, Nockamixon Sail Club

Sculling may make more sense than oaring.

Sculling may make more sense than oaring. You could rig something for the boom crutch hole and scull the boat. I would think that you have to stand on the seat to scull the oar.

I just want to get out of my canal without messing with an engin

I just want to get out of my canal without messing with an engine. Sculling may be the way to go.
quote:
[i]Originally posted by sawyerspadre[/i] [br]Not to be a wise-guy, but it seems somehow wrong to put oarlocks on. The weight of the boat would give you a nice workout, and you would have to fashion a seat of some sort. The flat side decks would make it tricky, you would need long oars to get to the water without hitting the deck. The boat seems ideally suited for sailing, however... Phil Scheetz FS 4086

Along those lines I mention that I am carving a paddle for my bo

Along those lines I mention that I am carving a paddle for my boat. If you really need to scull often, you might consider carving yourself a special oar which is longer than probably anything you'd be able to buy in order to skull from the cockpit. Having your own self-made oar would be a nice addition to your boat and conversation piece. A single, removable oarlock (scullock?) mounted on the transom about 8" off center would be perfect. There's a neat write up here: http://councill.home.mindspring.com/sbjournal/sculling/scull1.html "If the sea did wild or wicked things, it was because she could not help them." - Hemmingway

The question is how much sailing experience do you have? I have

The question is how much sailing experience do you have? I have sailed my Flying Scot in and out along a 1/2 mile long 75 ft wide canal in Florida. If you are new to sailing, practice in open water. The only time there is a problem is when the canal is very shallow and you can not get any board down and you have a head wind. If it is deep enough for the rudder to be fully down then lower the centerboard part way. You should be able to tack out in a headwind and get in excercise and expertise in tacking. If you are worried about the return then consider sailing in under jib only as long as there is a beam or following wind. Drop the jib when you want to stop. If it is very shallow and you can not sail you can always use the paddle as pole. Best Wishes. Gabor

Dear Dan, I am also going to

Dear Dan,

I am also going to do this.  I just bought 3430 and am new to all this.   The research that I have done indicates that we will need long oars, say over 9' long.  There is a formula.  Those are pretty long oars.  I think another issue is the oar locks.  I am looking at flush mounted oar locks, but maybe be able to use temporary clamp on oar locks, working on that part.  Let me know what you decide.  One concern is angle of oar to water at Gunwale so as to not mar the gunwale from oar rubbing.