Hoisting & Dousing Mainsail

I have to raise our mainsail away from the docks out on the lake, can't just tie up to dock and be aligned to wind. So wondering the best way to raise and douse the mainsail as far as which hole for the boom crutch, which side of boom allow the sail to unroll into the cockpit, and what you do with the rudder (tiller tender or swing free). I want to know the way for singlehanding as well as when have one crewmember. Last time, I was raising the main and it lifted out of the boomcrutch before fully raised and bumped my crew member on the knoggin. Also when lowering sail, do you let out enough halyard, then repaw the winch while you go assist the boom into the crutch. These Scot beginner "How To Q's" are rather important to us....since no lazy jacks and no topping lift. Thanks a bunch, Jim

Comments

I usually let the sail unroll, and drop on dousing into the cock

I usually let the sail unroll, and drop on dousing into the cockpit on the port side. The winch handle goes on the starboard, so this side is easier to move around the boat if you douse the sail on the port side. When the halyard is fully raised the boom should swing freely above the crutch. I usuallly just guide the boom into the crutch, with my left hand, as I release the halyard with my right. Be sure the vang is eased, as it will pull the boom down pretty hard and make it hard to get into the crutch if you miss with the boom. If you have to maneouver the boat to get to where you can raise the sail, you will want to use the side crutch hole, in the seat, not the center. The center impedes the movement of the tiller. I usually do this, at the dock, head to wind. My crew is usually standing on the dock, holding the dock line. As such, they never get bumped. If I have to raise it on the water, and I am raising it, then the crew should sit on the windward side and hold the tiller (and steer if needed). They will have to keep and eye on the boom to avoid getting bumped. Do you leave the dock by paddling? Motoring? Phil Scheetz FS 4086

Phil Scheetz

FS 4086

Fleet 163, Nockamixon Sail Club

Phil, We usually motor out of the docks (C & D) and have used a

Phil, We usually motor out of the docks (C & D) and have used a paddle. I think we will consider paddling to the end of C dock and seeing if there is any dock space for holding the boat to the wind, which I know makes it very easy. Good comments and especially easing the vang upon dousing to control the boom in the crutch. This is fun getting to know the vagaries of this boat. Jim

Jim, Good advice from Phil, as usual.

Jim, Good advice from Phil, as usual. You might also consider installing the topping lift available from Flying Scots. I installed one this year and like it. Jim

I would like to also thank David Luckenbach for sharing good ide

I would like to also thank David Luckenbach for sharing good ideas on this topic via email. He mentioned getting the blades up when raising sail at a dock to limit boat motion and if out on the lake considering even anchoring. Plus he uses a PFD cushion instead of a boom crutch and recommends using Sailkote to lube the sail track for faster sail up and down. Now to try all your ideas.

Yesterday the wife and I tried paddling the Scot between two doc

Yesterday the wife and I tried paddling the Scot between two docks to the end of the docks for sail raising....me paddling and wife steering. We found out darn quick that I had to be on the leeward side to be able to not run into adjacent boats. Was sort of like paddling a canoe. If someone didn't realize the problem with a side wind, they would be in trouble....and putting the tiller full over would just act as a brake.

Just a quickie on paddling.

Just a quickie on paddling. The best way to paddle a Scot solo is to sit on the very bow, straddling the forestay. That way you can shift the paddling from side to side as necessary. To set up for this, raise your rudder blade all the way out of the water, or secure the tiller on centerline or unship the rudder. Lower the Centerboard just a few inches to make a skeg to keep the boat tracking straight. Bob New FS 5143 Merritt Island Florida Fleet Captain Fleet 179

I saw a guy with a new FS just let the boom fall on the aft deck

I saw a guy with a new FS just let the boom fall on the aft deck when lowering the main. This not only causes damage to the deck, but sounds bad! You can use the Spinnake Halyard, as a temportary Topping Lift, to keep the boom from falling, while maintaining control of the boom. Another problem I have experienced is what to do with the main sail once it is in the cockpit. How do get it stored easily? I have seen people take it completely off the boom and roll it up on land every time they sail, sounds like a lot of work to me. Flaking the sail over the boom is another good method, but if you are by yourself this is not easy. A FS sailor in our fleet came up with a good idea that makes this task alot easier. Visualize two hollow poles, 1/2 in dia, one 9-8 feet long, the other 6 feet long, running parallel and centered, to each other, and taped together at the ends of the 6 foot pole. I use one steel pole and one alum pole. When you want to roll up your sails, all you need to do is bring the tip of the main over the boom, to the starboard side of the cockpit. Then slightly spread the two poles, at the center, and insert the tip of the main between the poles up to the first batten. Then just continue to roll the main up on the poles and strap the roll to the boom. This works very nicely and can be done by one person easily! We are thinking of marketing this device and calling it "The Stick" or maybe just "The Pole" What do you think? I will try and get some pictures. I just experienced another benefit of "The Pole" this weekend! My wife and I were sailing in 16-18 MPH winds, and quickly found ourselves in over our heads. We had already reefed the main sail (first time using the reef technique) before leaving the dock, and were enjoying the ride. However, as the winds increased we found it more & more difficult to handle the boat, and almost went over once. At this point we were in a panic mode, and didn't think that dropping the Jib would return us to a comfort zone. We tried to seek shelter in a cove, to drop the sails, but this only provided marginal relief, the wind was to strong. My wife was lowering the Jib, while I rolled up the main, using "The Pole." I couldn't wait for her to return to the cockpit, because the wind was still blowing us into shore. Without "The Pole" there was no way I could have gotten the main under control and stored in that strong of wind! I never invisioned that "The Pole" could be considered a safety device, but it kept us out of trouble that day! Once the sails were stored, we were able to start our 2HP Honda and motor back to our dock, safe & dry.

Hi Phil, It is hard to picture what you said, well, at least

Hi Phil, It is hard to picture what you said, well, at least for me it was! The pictures would be great! I would love some as I single all the time and the main is a royal pain. Are the parallel poles used to sandwich the head of the main so that you can start rolling the sail using the pole as the center of the roll? Why not use pvc? The thicker stiffer ones, schedule 20? What do you do with the poles once the sail is rolled up? Leave them there? Thanks Peter

Yes, you sandwich the sail between the centers of the poles.

Yes, you sandwich the sail between the centers of the poles. Be sure to insert the main up to the first batten, then start to roll the rest of the sail up. I used metal poles because they will not bend, plastic will bend. Last year I used one steel pole and one alum pole. This year I thought I would save some weight and use alum for both poles, but found it didn't feel as good, and I didn't feel I had as much control/balance, so I switched back to steel/alum. Note, be sure to put rubber tips on the end of the poles to protect your sails. Also, put a spacer of approximately 1/4 inch between the poles where they are tapes together. This will let you spread the poles apart a little easier to insert the sail. I used a piece of rolled up duct tape, about 3/4 inch wide. I also used 1/8 dia string, rather than tape, to hold the poles together, I wanted the nautical look. I store the pole inside the boat, suspended, by a sling under the seat to keep it from rolling around. As you can tell their was alot of engineering thought and time spent in the development of the prototype, to get it just right. I hope you give some feed back once you try it, I know you will like "The Pole"!

Thanks for the reply.

Thanks for the reply. My boat is put away for the summer .... I will be trying your system in the fall. I will try the thicker PVC pipe from home depot, if it is too flexible I think I will try a pipe inside a pipe to increase stiffness. Sound like something fun to experiment with. I love coming up with better and easier ways to sail these wonderful boats. Are you still using the "palm"? Peter Dubé Vero Beach Florida

Yes, I still have my 2HP Honda on back, although I only used it

Yes, I still have my 2HP Honda on back, although I only used it for 3 min on each sail, and the "Palm" is hooked up and working great.

Just wondering.

Just wondering... instead of 2 lengths of pipe, have you considered one pipe with a shackle at one end which can be used to attach the head of the sail? Kelly FS#5798

I would suggest that you try "The Pole" as designed, first! I ha

I would suggest that you try "The Pole" as designed, first! I have always felt that since the Wheel has already been invented, it wasn't necessary to try and re-invent the Wheel. However. there is always room for improvement. Let everyone know which design works best for you. This way, everyone learns from each other. Rember the "KISS" princple!

This sounds like a great idea if only I could get my mind wrappe

This sounds like a great idea if only I could get my mind wrapped around it. I may be a little slow, but... are you removing the foot of the sail from the boom prior to inserting the sail into "the pole"? If so, then the sail is doubled up to the first batten? Thanks in advance.

Perhaps I am envisioning this thing from the wrong end.

Perhaps I am envisioning this thing from the wrong end. When you say insert to the "first" batten do you mean the top one or the bottom? Are you rolling from the head down or from the foot up?

quote:[i]Originally posted by sdesmo[/i] [br]Perhaps I am envis

quote:
[i]Originally posted by sdesmo[/i] [br]Perhaps I am envisioning this thing from the wrong end. When you say insert to the "first" batten do you mean the top one or the bottom? Are you rolling from the head down or from the foot up?
Yes, from the top down! The main is already dropped into the cockpit. Just pull the top tip of the sail over the boom, insert the tip between the poles, up to the first batten, and roll the sail up, and then strap it to the boom. This will turn a difficult tast, if you single hand, into a much easier operation. Try it and report back.

It would be nice if someone could do a quicktime video of this p

It would be nice if someone could do a quicktime video of this process. Quicktime videos are very easy to use and can be very helpful in instructing in all things from stepping a mast using the mast helper to installing the rudder lift. If anyone knows of any out there I would love to learn of them.

This pole thing just squeezes the main between two poles to keep

This pole thing just squeezes the main between two poles to keep it rigid to facilitate rolling. The connected end is the vertex of the clamp. The shorter pole grabs it and the longer one is the guide, right? It should be mentioned that the halyard must come off first. I like it (if I am describing it right). Shackling it to the sail head may work but sounds actually tougher to do than just squeezing it between the two. But is two even necessary? It may slip a little with one pole only but still seems workable, but maybe not. Still sounds pretty MacGuyverish to me! "If the sea did wild or wicked things, it was because she could not help them." - Hemmingway

It sounds like you have the idea! I know from my experence, th

It sounds like you have the idea! I know from my experence, that if two people are on board, it is easier and faster to flake the main sail over the boom, and may even cause less wear and tear on the sail. However, if you are singlehanding, or suddeningly need to drop the sails in high wind,then the "Pole" will do the better job. I made some under seat brackets (pictures to come, if I get my camera and computer to co operate)to stow the "Pole" as well as my Whisker pole, dock pole, and boom chutch. In addition, I made brackets to secure my two paddles to either side of the center board truck. These two additions have worked out incredibly well, things don't roll around on the floor and it looks really ship shape!

Stowing the main rolled and bungied on the boom is definitely th

Stowing the main rolled and bungied on the boom is definitely the way to go. Using the pole system is one approach, but I find it's not necessary. At the end of a sail, I roll the main by myself without the use of poles or anyone else. I start by releasing the halyard and gently lower the boom into the boom crutch while letting the main fall on the port side of the cockpit. I then disconnect the halyard from the head and attach it to the mast. While standing to starboard at the forward end of the cockpit with the head of the main draped over the boom, I start by folding about 2' of the head over itself while keeping the leaches together. With the folded head in hand, I proceed to roll the main along the leach. The rolling procedure goes as follows: pull about 1-1/2' of sail over the boom to your side, flatten out any wrinkles, roll to the boom, pull another 1-1/2', and so on. As the sail rolls continue to work yourself aft. The battens can remain in because they come in parallel to the roll. After rolling is complete, I generally attach it with bungies to the boom. Questions are welcome....Glen (Sayville, NY, FS2102)

This is such a neat idea.

This is such a neat idea. I do roll my main and keep on the boom during the season. I have a canvass cover that snaps over the main to protect from sunlight and other elements and then keep another canvass canopy over the boom and snapped around the mast that covers the cockpit. It is almost impossible to roll the main in the boat, especially single handed, but this seems to be the solution that I will try, particularly as I single hand quite a bit of the time and find rolling the main difficult even on land. I also roll my jib and have found that one can do this easily with the jib still attached foreward. Then undo forward and flip the rolled jib over with sheets attached into the cockpit. I also keep my chute in the boat by pulling it out of its pouch on the seat and flaking it loosely across the interior of the cockpit. This way I can put the boat in the water and have the sails up and off sailing in a matter of just a few minutes. John McLaughlin Ngulule Customflex #1554

quote:[i]Originally posted by sdesmo[/i] [br]Perhaps I am envis

quote:
[i]Originally posted by sdesmo[/i] [br]Perhaps I am envisioning this thing from the wrong end. When you say insert to the "first" batten do you mean the top one or the bottom? Are you rolling from the head down or from the foot up?
I am guessing first batten from the top - fold the sail head over the bar and then roll down to the foot. "If the sea did wild or wicked things, it was because she could not help them." - Hemmingway

Is the 6' pole centered on the longer pole or lined up at one en

Is the 6' pole centered on the longer pole or lined up at one end? R.Lewis FS367 Chin up

The 6 foot pole is centered on the longer pole.

The 6 foot pole is centered on the longer pole. I have found that 9 feet works a little better than 8 feet. Please remember to put rubber ends one both pole so you won't damage the sails, and a 1/4 inch spacer between the two ends prior to attaching them together. I have seen several people try plastic PVC poles, but they bend way to much and make the job much harder. I recommend either 1 alum tube for the 6 foot section and 1 steel tube for the 8/9 section, or both alum poles.

Hey Glen You wrote, "start by folding about 2' of the head over

Hey Glen You wrote, "start by folding about 2' of the head over itself while keeping the leaches together. With the folded head in hand, I proceed to roll the main along the leach." What exactly do you mean by "keeping the leaches together" ? And also to "roll the main along the leach"....what does this mean. Stupid ole me figures you just put the headboard into the middle of the 6ft pole to the first batten, and start rolling couple of feet at a time....all along, keeping the rolled tube parallel to the boom. I am not sure how the battens line up when doing this...in line with the boom, or angled across the boom (?). Thanks, Jim

quote:[i]Originally posted by shugart5372[/i] [br]Hey Glen You

quote:
[i]Originally posted by shugart5372[/i] [br]Hey Glen You wrote, "start by folding about 2' of the head over itself while keeping the leaches together. With the folded head in hand, I proceed to roll the main along the leach." What exactly do you mean by "keeping the leaches together" ? And also to "roll the main along the leach"....what does this mean. Stupid ole me figures you just put the headboard into the middle of the 6ft pole to the first batten, and start rolling couple of feet at a time....all along, keeping the rolled tube parallel to the boom. I am not sure how the battens line up when doing this...in line with the boom, or angled across the boom (?). Thanks, Jim
I think it's meant that when you fold the headboard over the leach of the sail is doubled over so then just roll, keeping it (the leach edge of the sail) all along the same plane. "If the sea did wild or wicked things, it was because she could not help them." - Hemmingway

Jim, I'm sorry that it's taken me a while to get back to you

Jim, I'm sorry that it's taken me a while to get back to you. Picture rolliing a carpet and keeping the left edge of the carpet even as you roll. Since the sail is triangular, you can either roll along the leach (left) or along the luff (right) while standing on the startboard side of the boat. Only one side will be kept in alignment while rolling towards the stern. I hope this helps....Glen

This is a bit off-topic, but just to comment on the situation of

This is a bit off-topic, but just to comment on the situation of getting the main down and out of the way with a big blow coming. We were in a similar situation with a squall line approaching fast and I followed the advice I had read from a very old article in "best of Scots-n-Water" Drop the main quickly, then detach the boom from the mast at the gooseneck and shove both under one of the seats. This gave us room in the cockpit when the fury hit. It was good advice.