Jib Cleat Position

Would anyone know if the jib sheet cleats have ever been installed on the centerboard trunk cap? It seems like a convenient location for single-handing and for crew access. While there is no center thwart, as on a Thistle, to take up the additional lateral force sheeting will create, it seems that the trunk is sufficiently sized for this added load (probably in the order of 50-60#). Any thoughts?

Comments

I have used jib cleating in the CB trunk for the past 30 years.

I have used jib cleating in the CB trunk for the past 30 years. It is ideal for 2 people or sailing with one. This system was very common in Ohio back in the mid 70's, especially with the fleet at Hoover Reservoir. Most of the early systems used two 1" tracks, each about 3' in length bolted to the CB trunk. Mounted on each trac is a Mariner block and cleat. The angle is perfect for the crew to release the jib. It is also handy in light air when the skipper can handle both main and jib sheets. I had a newer second Scot rigged with seat clearing which the crew did not like as well as the CB location. The angle made it harder for the crew to release the sheet Can forward you pictures if you wish Jack F Stewart FS1342 Alliance, OH

Thanks for getting back to me.

Thanks for getting back to me. I definitely would like to see a picture of the installation if you don't mind sending. I'm just wondering, how often do you use the track to adjust the cleat position?

The cleat position on the track is never changed.

The cleat position on the track is never changed. The channel for the Mariner block and cleat is about 2" long. It has a thumb screw which holds the cleat in place using a small hole drilled in the 3" long track. These Mariner blocks are very common in the Highlander and some old Thistles. Jack F Stewart FS1342

I have seen a few who have used a Harken 241 Bullseye w/swivel B

I have seen a few who have used a Harken 241 Bullseye w/swivel BOLTED to the CB cap. This cleat uses a bullseye insteat of a block for the fairleat. The important item is to have a short cleat with an angle plate for the cleat that can be bent to the proper angle. The problem with the Harken block is the plate is a little thin and bends too easily. The plate on Mariner blocks is double theHarken thickness. The Mariner version is called a Genoa fairlead block. Comes in a high or long version and a short version found on one designs, Hope this helps Jack F Stewart FS1342

Thanks for the additional information.

Thanks for the additional information. I'm familiar with the Harken 241 swivel block. Now that I think about it, I believe I have a couple, along with a pair of Ratchamatic blocks. Thanks for helping plan my weekend project...Glen Krapf (FS2101)