Spin Pole Stowage when racing

I've been having some grief when setting/storing the spin pole during races. Right now when dousing the chute I leave the topping lift and poleguy attached to the pole, disconnect from sail and mast and slide the whole thing back into the cockpit along the CB trunk then forward a bit to keep it out of the skippers feet. Both of us do not like this arrangement and have talked about mounting it along side the boom similar to other performance dinghies we've sailed. Before I start drilling holes in my boom does anyone care to share their secrets for pole management? Bob Klein FS4049

Comments

Unhook it from the topping lift and throw it into the cockpit?

Unhook it from the topping lift and throw it into the cockpit? That's what we do but we don't have the perfect setup. The advanced setup are so that the topping lift does not have to be adjusted once the spinnaker pole is attached. This is done via a "down haul" bungee to keep the line nicely alongside the mast when not used. But the pole is still detached and trown on the floor of the cockpit.

Claus FS5074 Ames, IA

[quote][i]Originally posted by FS4049[/i] I got a couple of 2"

[quote][i]Originally posted by FS4049[/i] I got a couple of 2" in Diameter heavy wall PVC pipe couplers at any Home Depot type of store. Drill a 1/2" hole in one side. Mount one on the aft end of the centerboard area about 6" off the floor. Mount the other one up by the tabernacle so that the Spinnaker pole fits in it. We have used this for years, it works great, doesn't break and keeps the pole out from under your feet. Regards Pat Glazier FS 5322 Cowan Lake, Ohio Patrick Glazier

I've used a similar solution, but keep it under the deck .

I've used a similar solution, but keep it under the deck ... in 1770 - i use a thin walled , <7' pvc pipe (capped one end ...put the capped end under deck into the bow, attach open end to tabernacle (up high , close to deck) and slide pole in after spin douse ...make the tube 3-4" shorter than pole , free end can be grabbed, hook guy, then t/l, then mast ring as you're deploying .. help to have an able deck monkey BP

Flying Scot 5157 - we do the same as Claus does.

Flying Scot 5157 - we do the same as Claus does. WE jut put the pole into the cockpit gently when I remove ot from the topping lift. I put it forward enough to get it out of the skipper's way, but not so far forward that it is hard to get out when I need to set the pole. It seems to be okay and is always handy when I need it. I'd like to know how others make out with having it mounted somewhere in the boat with a fast disconnect setup. Thanks. Diane Kampf dian...@charter.net

Diane Kampf FS 5857

Well I finally got around to rigging my spinnaker pole downguy a

Well I finally got around to rigging my spinnaker pole downguy as a bungee cord retracting through a thru-deck fitting just fwd of the mast base, then through a turning block on the fwd side of the tabernackle, then to a pulley attached to the bow block , then back to the tabernackle. Now, all I do is drop the topping line and let the pole stay snug to the deck un der the jib sheets ready to go. It's easy to do and quite successful as I won the spring and summer Greenhaven Sailing Club series. Thanks for all the advice.

We throw it on the floor on the starboard side.

We throw it on the floor on the starboard side. Anything more complicated violates the KISS principal. J. Lott

We try to follow the KISS principle; we put it down in the cockp

We try to follow the KISS principle; we put it down in the cockpit on the starboard side and slide it forward a little. We have a bow bag and the end of the pole slides up under it. This keeps it from rolling around. The thing for us is we do it the same way every time, practice, practice, practice - - habit, habit, habit. Bruce FS2777
Bruce FS 5600

On the North Sails site (http://www.

On the North Sails site (http://www.northsailsod.com/faqs/faq-fscot.html) Greg Fisher says mounting the pole on the boom would be illegal. Can anyone explain why? Thanks. Glenn FS 5919 Nockamixon Sail Club http://nockamixonsailclub.org

Glenn Wesley

FS #5919 - DJ'

The spin pole is 7 feet long and the boom is 12 feet and change

The spin pole is 7 feet long and the boom is 12 feet and change so stowing the pole there would have the aft portion in the area which is to be free of fittings which could catch the rigging of another boat. There may be some other rules which apply as well but I'm not sure. Most everyone I know stows the pole on the floor on the starboard side. If you put it against the cb trunk and tuck the forward end under the bow bag it is out of the way and stays put but is easy to reach when you need it again.

Greg Fisher is correct.

Greg Fisher is correct. The TS Article S-III para 5. b is the controlling provision. Since the end fitting on the pole could snag a competitor shroud when the boom is out, storing the pole on the boom is not permitted. Also storing the pole on the boom would increase the weight of the boom which would be detrimental to the setting of the main sail in light air - an even tighter leach. Bob Neff Chief Measurer

It has come to my attention that a number of boats have been rig

It has come to my attention that a number of boats have been rigged to store the pole on the boom. What I had not considered in my previous comment was the possibility of storing the pole with the jaws in a fixed position. Fixing the pole with the aft jaw in the up or down position would preclude the jaw that extends into the “after 8 feet” from snagging the rigging of an overlapped boat. And as long as the pole was free on any other protrusions that might snag the rigging, the storage system would meet the intent of Article S-III par 5.b. With the above in mind I am proposing the following CMR to the Board of Governors to clarify that the ergonomic decision of storing the pole on the boom is permitted. CMR XX Storing the spinnaker pole on the boom does not conflict with the requirement of Article S-III par 5. b. that “ the after eight (8) feet of the boom must be without any protrusion that might catch the rigging of another boat” provided that the following criteria are met: 1. The pole shall be attached to the boom such that the aft jaw is fixed in either the up or down position and shall be free of any protrusions that might catch/snag the rigging of another boat. 2. Any hardware to support the stored pole shall be attached forward of “the after 8 feet of the boom”. This CMR “grandfathers” all boats so rigged that meet the above criteria. Bob Neff Chief Measurer

Essentially the FS class rules seek to prohibit any thing on the

Essentially the FS class rules seek to prohibit any thing on the boom that can catch rigging, on your boat or others. The FS class rules are available online at FSSA.com. Refer to the "CMR" Cheif Measurer Rulings section. From a racing perspective, mounting the spin pole on the boom is not good. It would induce more drag, place weight higher aloft (versus the pole on the floor), and more opportunity for error with lines that could catch. Stow the pole forward, on the floor under the foredeck of you Scot. The pole is then available for either a Port or Starboard spin set and also, you'll be sailing just like the big dogs that consistently win. -Michael
quote:
[i]Originally posted by glennw_fs[/i] [br]On the North Sails site (http://www.northsailsod.com/faqs/faq-fscot.html) Greg Fisher says mounting the pole on the boom would be illegal. Can anyone explain why? Thanks. Glenn FS 5919 Nockamixon Sail Club http://nockamixonsailclub.org
Michael Mittman FS# 5804, Fleet 23 Corinthian Sailing Club White Rock Lake Dallas, TX

Michael Mittman

FS 5804, Fleet 23

Corinthian Sailing Club

White Rock Lake, Dallas, TX, USA

quote:[i]Originally posted by mmittman[/i] [br]Essentially the

quote:
[i]Originally posted by mmittman[/i] [br]Essentially the FS class rules seek to prohibit any thing on the boom that can catch rigging, on your boat or others. The FS class rules are available online at FSSA.com. Refer to the "CMR" Cheif Measurer Rulings section. From a racing perspective, mounting the spin pole on the boom is not good. It would induce more drag, place weight higher aloft (versus the pole on the floor), more opportunity for error with lines that could catch, and added weight on the Main Sail downwind ...bad, bad, bad. Stow the pole forward, on the floor under the foredeck of you Scot. The pole is then available for either a Port or Starboard spin set and also, you'll be sailing just like the big dogs that consistently win. -Michael
quote:
[i]Originally posted by glennw_fs[/i] [br]On the North Sails site (http://www.northsailsod.com/faqs/faq-fscot.html) Greg Fisher says mounting the pole on the boom would be illegal. Can anyone explain why? Thanks. Glenn FS 5919 Nockamixon Sail Club http://nockamixonsailclub.org
Michael Mittman FS# 5804, Fleet 23 Corinthian Sailing Club White Rock Lake Dallas, TX
Michael Mittman FS# 5804, Fleet 23 Corinthian Sailing Club White Rock Lake Dallas, TX

Michael Mittman

FS 5804, Fleet 23

Corinthian Sailing Club

White Rock Lake, Dallas, TX, USA

I have noticed that the top sailors in the class seem to throw t

I have noticed that the top sailors in the class seem to throw the pole on the floor. It doesn't seem to slow down Terhune, Gough, Fisher, etc. I also especially enjoy when my crew enthusiastically pulls it out from under the foredeck as the aft end of the pole always seems to be near my face as they are focused in front of them. I have only been clocked in the mouth once, which promotes a heightened sense of awareness of the pole, and an urgency to choreograph the spin set with newer crew. Whatever doesn't kill you makes you stronger, right? Phil Scheetz FS 4086

Phil Scheetz

FS 4086

Fleet 163, Nockamixon Sail Club