Main sheet hang up

We sailed our Flying Scot for the first time and had a problem with the main sheet hanging up on the transom corners and under the rudder. Can anyone make some suggestions how to prevent this from happening? I rather save mid boom sheet for a last resort. Any suggestions would be greatly appreciated. rudy galasso

Comments

I haven't had problems like that but this might work for you ht

I haven't had problems like that but this might work for you http://home.att.net/~unofficial-flyingscot-page/rudder.html FS 1385

My mainsheet has gotten hung up on the top of the rudder head at

My mainsheet has gotten hung up on the top of the rudder head at times while jibing. One remedy is to attach some bungee to the lower block of the sheet and to the tiller so the bungee pulls the block forward so it won't catch. Also while jibing the skipper can sheet in sharply to take the slack out of the sheet which helps avoid a snag. Mid-boom sheeting really isn't necessary and is not legal for racing.

like dave812 said above, try pulling the mainsheet tighter so yo

like dave812 said above, try pulling the mainsheet tighter so you don't have that much slack in the line. it could have been that if there was to much slack in the sheet that it caused it to catch the corners. i don't know about the rudder though, it hasn't happened to me yet but sure it will someday. also the more you go out the more you will learn.

There is what appears to be a good rigging idea in "Scots n' Wat

There is what appears to be a good rigging idea in "Scots n' Water" on page 60...with a photo to go along with the short article. The author suggests a short piece of wire, about 8 inches, with a loop nicropressed at both ends. One loop slips onto the shackle on the rudder head and the other connects onto the mainsheet block. So, now, you have the same set-up as usual but with the addition of an 8-inch wire between the rudder head and the mainsheet block that was attached to the rudder head. Next, a small cheek block is attached onto the tiller about 14" from the rudder head. A 3' piece of shock cord is dead-ended to the cheek block on the tiller and attached to the upper end of the wire; that is, the end at the mainsheet block. This arrangement uses the shock cord to keep the mainsheet tackle inside the rear outer edges of the boat in light air and jibes. The author suggests also pulling in on the mainsheet during jibes to prevent the mainsheet from wrapping around the rudder head or sterm corners. Looks like an interesting and effective arrangement. Hope this helps! Good Scotin', - Jim Locke - FS 4592 - Montgomery, Alabama