Jib ratchet mahogany mounting block

At least that is how it is listed on Flying Scot parts list. One of my blocks is split and needs repair/replacement. My Flying Scot is #2353 built by Customflex. My understanding is that the hardware has nuts on the underside. I am looking for ideas on how to access the underside of block through the log of Styrofoam. It is too long to slide out of the way and I anticipate a lot of Styrofoam beads, statically charged, clinging to everything if I try to cut the log in half or cut a plug out of it. Any thoughts out there on how to do this cleanly? Thank you.

Comments

Dennis i anxiously await some good replies.

Dennis i anxiously await some good replies.........i tried to solicit (probably my own fault in how i worded it )previously)....I have actual winches in my Scot #618 (built 1964) and unfortunately i removed the bolts holding the winches in place ( to refinish the blocks) and of course the nuts fell out......it was difficult getting back underneath the decks to put the replace the nuts. the styrofoam blocks were VERY difficult to move and becuase the are so old they now are a bit fragile waiting for the wisdom of this forum! John Blanchard Narragansett Bay (Rhode Island)

John, I too thought of cutting the fiberglass straps, but hesit

John, I too thought of cutting the fiberglass straps, but hesitated for being able to reattach. I wrote Flying Scot who advised sliding the Styrofoam, but they don't very far on boat. They also suggested cutting a plug out of the Styrofoam and then repairing the hole. I know that beads of the stuff will be clinging to everything in and out of the boat...including me. My boat was made in 1993. The Styrofoam seems in good shape, but I haven't cut into it yet. Some one out there must have gone through this before. The off season is about here in Illinois and I am eager to get started on off season repairs.

Try cutting the block right under the winch.

Try cutting the block right under the winch. This way you can slide each part to the side. This should give you enough room to work. Just mark sure the small half of the cut, isnt so small it can float out.

Good thought.

Good thought. Making one straight cut would be easier than cutting a plug. Rejoining the two pieces should be easy to figure out. What I am still unsure of is which tool to do the cutting with. A keyhole saw would be thin and long enough to fit into the tight space I have to work in. It's blade is rather ragged and will produce a lot of waste. Any thoughts on the best cutting tool?
quote:
[i]Originally posted by elmills[/i] [br]Try cutting the block right under the winch. This way you can slide each part to the side. This should give you enough room to work. Just mark sure the small half of the cut, isnt so small it can float out.

Dennis not sure on the tool and I think i need to get in the boa

Dennis not sure on the tool and I think i need to get in the boat and look again underneath.......but I was thinking, I believe there are two blocks one on top of the other, perhaps more one as far fwd as yu can, and cut it over a support strap would be and move the other aft and but lightly different line from the one moved fwd so that you have offset cuts.......does that make any sens???? there has got to be someone out there that has done this before .......isn't there??? John (FS618)

The tool I used was a hack saw blade.

The tool I used was a hack saw blade. I got a spare blade, wrapped a rag around the bottom of the blade and cut the foam. Then I tried to shop vac up the little white balls before they got all over the boat. Watch your arms on the fiberglass straps, they can be very sharp. Note: Be prepared to really clean up after you trailer the boat for the first time, after the repair. You may think you have it all cleanded up until an hour or two of vibration from being on the road will get everything lose and you will need to clean it up again.

Hacksaw blade! Excellent! Thank you Everett.

Hacksaw blade! Excellent! Thank you Everett. If your club has any regattas, let me know. Lafayette is within a days drive for me. It would give me a chance to knock the little beads loose. As I recall John, I have a one large log of Styrofoam on each side. My boat is #2353 by Customflex. Time between building and different builders may offer some changes.

As a kid I learned to use a 9V battery and a thin wire to cut th

As a kid I learned to use a 9V battery and a thin wire to cut the Styrofoam. The current in the thin wire will make the wire hot and you melt through the Styrofoam (no mess - little smelly though). You'll just have to rig a thing that will tension the wire in a straight line and keep you from burning your fingers.

Claus FS5074 Ames, IA

quote:[i]Originally posted by Claus[/i] [br]As a kid I learned

quote:
[i]Originally posted by Claus[/i] [br]As a kid I learned to use a 9V battery and a thin wire to cut the Styrofoam. The current in the thin wire will make the wire hot and you melt through the Styrofoam (no mess - little smelly though). You'll just have to rig a thing that will tension the wire in a straight line and keep you from burning your fingers.
That sounds like a good idea. Here is what I would do - take a hacksaw, remove the blade, wrap the wire aound the ends, and attach the battery.

I wonder if it would work using the wire in a loop around the lo

I wonder if it would work using the wire in a loop around the log of styrofoam and pulling down as it cut/melted through. Thin wire? I assume thinner than bailing wire. Copper best? I will do some experimenting.

Hello - me too had to replace those old cracked wooden parts.

Hello - me too had to replace those old cracked wooden parts. i made new ones from Ocolon - round- machined to just a bit bigger diameter then the block. i used a model-knife to dig a hole in the foam - in order to squize the nut in... fair winds - Amir Eppler - Israel.

Dennis Not sure if you've solved your styrofoam issue yet but

Dennis Not sure if you've solved your styrofoam issue yet but I recently bought a used Scot (FS#2777) and when I picked it up the starboard turning block was loose. What I did was use my wife's electric carving knife (she said I could) to cut a plug big enough for my fist and forearm, then reseated the block with new stainless nuts & lock washers. My boat was build in 75 and had two layers of foam. Was a little tricky getting the top plug in and set but not too hard. The knife was quick and easy to control, mess was minimal, and it gave me a plug I could reinstall with white glue. I used good ol' duct tape to hold the plug while the glue set. Bruce FS#2777
Bruce FS 5600

I spoke to Dee at Flying Scot just this Saturday and she indicat

I spoke to Dee at Flying Scot just this Saturday and she indicates that around boat number 4000 they changed to a wood block and self tapping screws without nuts. I removed one screw to test her theory, and it was a self tapper. I just ordered the mahogany blocks from FS. My boat is 4086 and it is a Douglas built in 1985. I don't know how Customflex compares. Dennis, it almost sounds like your boat, from the number would have to be earlier than 1993. Phil Scheetz FS 4086

Phil Scheetz

FS 4086

Fleet 163, Nockamixon Sail Club

Before 1993, yes.

Before 1993, yes. 1973, actually. I am eager for the weather to change so I can get out there and play with the styrofoam log.

Dennis, I have a 1974 customflex and replaced the blocks.

Dennis, I have a 1974 customflex and replaced the blocks. I was able to slide the styrofoam blocks forward to access the nuts. Not easy, but some careful wiggling and they moved. Not a comfortable position as I recall, but that is boat repair! And yes I did drop the nuts and washers a few times, so clean the boat out before you start so you can find the nuts. Not a big job for me. By the way, I used Sikkens on the new blocks, so I hope they will last longer.

Prying one end of the fiberglass strap from the underside of the

Prying one end of the fiberglass strap from the underside of the foredeck will allow you to slide the foam billet out of your way and give you good access to underdeck fittings. To re-attach the strap I fastened it to its original spot using hot glue and then laid a few pieces of mat and resin over it to hold it into place. Good as new. BTW: There were several old wasp nests under there and they seem unable to resist nesting under the decks.

I had to make the same repair on my FS2365.

I had to make the same repair on my FS2365. I cut the one fiberglass retaining strap at the stern which allowed me to slide the styrofoam blocks back far enough (about 6 inches) to access the nuts. While you work essentially blind in a somewhat uncomfortable position, this does allow you access. I had some thoughts on re-attaching the fiberglass strap where I cut it, however, being that I could only move the blocks back about 6 inches before they were firmly stuck(the blocks get wider as you go forward on my boat,) I figured there was no way that they were going to float out. I sailed it that way for a full season without any issue. Good luck

Cut the styrofoam with a hacksaw blade.

Cut the styrofoam with a hacksaw blade. You can find a holder that lets the blade protrude or simply wrap a rag around the blade for hulding it. The hacksaw blade works great. Gabor

I read with interest this line of discussion, having recently re

I read with interest this line of discussion, having recently removed and re-attached my blocks easily (5097, with wood screws), and almost messing up a friend's blocks (2000 series, screws and nuts). Good thing we realized they were not the same. I am new at this, but have any of you considered molly screws for the older boats? Some of the larger ones may be rated for 50 lbs, so three of them makes 150 lb. Since the sheets run horizontal, there will be little or no vertical force, only horizontal shear stress (force) taken by the case of the molly screws, shared by the rubber gasket that is there, if I recall right. The case of the molly screw should add strength vs. the normal screw and the larger diameter distribute the force over more of the deck, reducing stress. If the molly needs replacing, drill the cap and push it through, just like in the wall of your house. Again, I am very new at this, so use your judgement before trying this. (Dipping the molly in polyurethane beforehand might help out with corrosion in the salt air.)

This sounds like a good option to me.

This sounds like a good option to me. Anybody tried it ?? FS 1385

quote:[i]Originally posted by Corsa[/i] [br]This sounds like a

quote:
[i]Originally posted by Corsa[/i] [br]This sounds like a good option to me. Anybody tried it ?? FS 1385
Maybe Gordon can be the Guinea pig for the molly screws. If I never reply as to how it went, it didn't work and he killed me. P. S. I would guess that anybody that goes through the trouble of removing the floatation should put some adhesive on a block of wood and stick it underneath the deck, thereby converting to wood screws. The only virtue of the molly screws is to avoid the mess of the styrofoam in the first place.

I would think they would be as strong as wod screws.

I would think they would be as strong as wod screws. If and when I get around to repairing my blocks, I think this is the way I will go. Just got to get a few projects out of the way first... FS 1385

All of the above is part of the argument for doing away with the

All of the above is part of the argument for doing away with the on-deck jib blocks and cleats and going to seat cleating... Makes it much nicer to sit on the deck when hiking out, too. My system puts the turning block all the way in the forward corner of the seat and the cleat is angled slightly to be fair-led to the normal crew position on the opposite side. (no need for a swivel) The only down side is that you can't use spinnaker turtles in the seat corners with this rig. Anyway, I have cut blocks in the past with a good sharp carving knife. It does produce lots of styrofoam mess however. One cut through both blocks directly under the fitting you need to work with, then slide the blocks apart. One other tip on getting the nuts back on... duct tape them as you put them up under the deck (this offsets the effect of gravity) Bob New Merritt Island, FL