Mast clearance and mast lowering while afloat

What clearance is required for a fully rigged Flying Scot passing under a bridge, assuming a typical crew of 2-3 adults? Relatedly, does anyone have a way of partially lowering the mast while on water? -Richard Larson (5573)

Comments

The mast height above the water is 28 ft, according to the FS we

The mast height above the water is 28 ft, according to the FS web site. I'm sure you can measure from the tabernacle to the waterline easily enough. As for partially lowering on water, I know that its been done with other sailboats. I've read many accounts on the web of trips that required this. However, I've not read of FS accounts. You could probably practice this on a calm lake near you. Rod
quote:
[i]Originally posted by rlarson[/i] [br]What clearance is required for a fully rigged Flying Scot passing under a bridge, assuming a typical crew of 2-3 adults? Relatedly, does anyone have a way of partially lowering the mast while on water? -Richard Larson (5573)

Just make sure you'll take spare hardware along, as unavoidably

Just make sure you'll take spare hardware along, as unavoidably cotter pins and clevis pins get dropped into the water.

Claus FS5074 Ames, IA

Another really fun trick that I've used to sneak a J-22 under a

Another really fun trick that I've used to sneak a J-22 under a railroad bridge is to intentionally heal the boat over. As extreme as it sounds, we would put a crew on up the mast on the spreaders and have the other two crew sit to leeward. This would lean the boat over but not far enought to get the water over the gunnel. Looks scary but really wasn't. Boy did it piss off the railroad bridge operator.... I imagine a scot could be done in a similar manner by sitting to leeward with a big fella on the boom.

Partially lowering a flying scot mast sounds like a bad idea to

Partially lowering a flying scot mast sounds like a bad idea to me. This only works on boats with inline spreaders where the shrouds will support the mast when partially down. You could rig some temporary side stays to hold the mast partially up, but it would probably be a whole lot easier just to lower it all the way. Once you do it a few times it is really quite easy. The heel method would probably not be a great idea on the Scot. Jerry FS 4899