Shroud tension and chainplate adjustment

My shrouds seem to have a fair amount of play, to the point that a 15 mph wind will move them easily when sitting on the trailer. I consulted the manual and the chainplate assemble is set as recommended with the middle hole (out of three) on the clip lined with the second hole (out of two) on the chainplate. The forestay seems loose also. When you tug on the forestay, there is about a half to three quarter inch draw. I have adjusted the turnbuckle under the forward; however, this seems to have net zero effect. I’m sure there is something I’ve missed. Any thought are greatly appreciated; is the Scot supposed to be loosely rigged? Ron D. White

Comments

Yep.

Yep. You have a "loose rigged" boat. Not to worry though. Lots of people have them and tightening a loose rigged boat down will slow you down. Many people here have switched to the "snug rig" which takes the slop out. However it requires a different jib cut. The loose rig is annoying, but harmless. FS4830

Yes, you have a loose rig boat, which is what the boat was origi

Yes, you have a loose rig boat, which is what the boat was originally designed for. But that doesn't mean that the rig "tension" is willy-nilly, there are some measurements that you should be aware of. For the loose rig, run a tape measure (steel is best so that the measurement is more accurate) up the mast attached to the main halyard. Do not tighten the halyard so that the shackle starts to go around the sheave. With the mast pushed fully aft by a friend (and no jib halyard tension) the measurement to the stern deck edge should be 28' 8" plus or minus 1/2". This dimension is controlled by the forestay. The push the the mast forward, the mast will be stopped by the shroulds. The difference in distances measured to the stern deck is the slop (also check the distance from the top of the mast to the top of each shrould tang to be sure that the mast is centered between port and starboard). Four inches of slop is/used to be the rule. Then three inches was OK. Some sail with 2", etc., until some now sail with 0" (i.e., a "snug" rig, but as mentioned, this requires a different jib and I don't even want to go further and get into the "tight" rig debate). You may have to try several different inches of slop to see what fits your jib best. Personally, I would start with 2" and adjust from there. A lot of this will depend on the conditions of your sails as well. If you are just cruising, then don't worry about it. Don't fear the looseness of the forestay or of the shrouds, this is normal if you are within the 4" of slop, but if you are outside of the 4" then I would adjust this looseness for safety. Did I mention that you adjust it by adding a channel with adjustment holes to the forestay? They are sold by FS or most boat stores. Anyone feel free to correct any of this.

Thanks both of you for the reply.

Thanks both of you for the reply. I'll play with the measurements but it sounds like I'm fine. Fairly certain I'm within the 4" slop rule. Thanks again, Ron Ron D. White

Don't forget to tighten the rig when you're not sailing.

Don't forget to tighten the rig when you're not sailing. If the rig is not tight, the mast rocks back and forth and wears on the mast step. On a mooring the wear is dramatic and fast, but even dry sailed boats should tighten the rig when ashore (the mast moves around in wind gusts). A common way to do this is to take the jib halyard forward to the bow eye and then tighten the halyard to make the rig snug. This also keeps the halyard away from the mast, reducing wear on these items; "halyard slapping" is stopped too. John

Hi John, When putting away the boat after a wonderful sail th

Hi John, When putting away the boat after a wonderful sail this weekend, I pulled the jib halyard forward and attached it to the jib tack wire rather than the bow eye. Simply plain forgot you had said bow eye and the wichard shakle seemed reasonable. What is the logic to attaching the jib halyard to the bow eye? Obviously you recomend that and not the previous otherwise you would have said jib tack wire. In either case, I rather prefer bringing the jib halyard forward and attaching it to something. If seems better support for the mast. Thanks for the tip. Regards, Ron D. White
quote:
[i]Originally posted by jfluard[/i] [br]Don't forget to tighten the rig when you're not sailing. If the rig is not tight, the mast rocks back and forth and wears on the mast step. On a mooring the wear is dramatic and fast, but even dry sailed boats should tighten the rig when ashore (the mast moves around in wind gusts). A common way to do this is to take the jib halyard forward to the bow eye and then tighten the halyard to make the rig snug. This also keeps the halyard away from the mast, reducing wear on these items; "halyard slapping" is stopped too. John
Ron D. White

Ron, There is virtually no difference between attaching it to

Ron, There is virtually no difference between attaching it to the bow eye or the tack shackle. John