Trailer for the Scot

It appears to this FS newcomer that the Trailex-manufactured trailer modified by FS, Inc. is especially well-suited to the boat, but it costs at least $300 more than a new trailer I can buy locally. I don't intend to dry sail but rather will winter store the boat on the trailer and perhaps take it off its mooring for an occasional trip to Maine (from the Boston area). Is the customization worth the expense?

Comments

yes,yes and yes.

yes,yes and yes. You really get what you pay for and come resale time you will be glad you made the investment.

quote:[i]Originally posted by Elisily[/i] [br]Is the customizat

quote:
[i]Originally posted by Elisily[/i] [br]Is the customization worth the expense?
Absolutely. You should choose either the galvanized or trailex aluminum from Flying Scot Inc. Both are set up to accommodate the Flying Scot. From my experience with the trailex aluminum trailer I would recommend it in all respects. It trails beautifully. The boat lies lower to the ground in it, which makes it easier getting in and out. Launching and retrieving is smooth. If you opt for the galvanized trailer, you will be fine, too. I just think the Trailex is tops. FSSA Forum editor

I have had two trailers not made specifically for the Flying Sco

I have had two trailers not made specifically for the Flying Scot. The first one did not tilt and ramp or beach launching and retrievel was much more difficult. My current trailer is a tilt model and works very well. I can beach launch without submerging the bearings, I sail in salt water so this is a plus. Update; I now have the trailex alum. tailer and it is great. Beach launching is easy (if the van doesn't get stuck) and the bearings never need to be submerged.

I have the Trailex trailer and would get it again without a ques

I have the Trailex trailer and would get it again without a question. It's quite a sturdy trailer and it's quite easy to launch the boat from it. I'm amazed at how well the boat and trailer are balanced. The trailer put enough weight on the ball for towing, yet you can easily lift the trailer tongue. Our Trailex is about 8 years old. I decided to redo the wiring since some lights didn't have good grounding anymore. I choosed to use LED lights, soldered the wires and ran an extra ground wire to the lights in the hope that the wiring and lights will last for ever. I also bought from Trailex a spare tire holder that I mounted on the right side right in front of the axle. Our trailer squeaks a little and I think it's coming from either the joins by the spring or from the spring blades rubbing against each other.

Claus FS5074 Ames, IA

FS Hull #287 "Yellow Submarine" uses a Gator Trailer which tilts

FS Hull #287 "Yellow Submarine" uses a Gator Trailer which tilts. It's very lightweight and the boat is well balanced with just the right amount of tongue weight. Pulling with a Toyota Tacoma pulls great with no swaying and tracks beautifully behind my little toyota. It is not galvanized and spent several weekends painting it with rustoleum it was very rusty after 50 years.. I also just got finished applying wood decking the trailer. Without the boat on the trailer I can drive my riding lawnmower right up on it when in it's tilted up..so my little boat trailer doubles as a nice utility trailer. while my boat sits on a small rolling dolly.. I plan on painting my hull ather this summer. I'd like to flip my boat over for sanding but I'm not sure how I am gonna do this. Is anyone out there has any suggestions I would be happy to get feedback on..

The aluminum Trailex is low enough that it does not need to tilt

The aluminum Trailex is low enough that it does not need to tilt to ramp launch without wetting the bearings. Highly recommend the extra expense for the aluminum version - no rust and light weight. The Scot sits in it, not so much on it. One can lean in from outside the boat while standing on the ground and reach the bilge. I could not reach past the seats with my old galvanized Tee-Nee because the Scot sat on it a few inches higher. My bearings have never been dunked and I ramp launch at venues from Canada to Florida with no sweat. No tilt needed.

HotWheels said: "My bearings have never been dunked and I ramp l

HotWheels said: "My bearings have never been dunked and I ramp launch at venues from Canada to Florida with no sweat. No tilt needed." I have a newer Scot with the Trailex also. It is amazing that the hubs dont get near the water when launching and retrieving! I could not believe it. And it is SO easy to do both. The trailer is really a thing of beauty too. No regrets. Peter Vero Beach FL

quote:[i]Originally posted by martydufour[/i] [br]I plan on pai

quote:
[i]Originally posted by martydufour[/i] [br]I plan on painting my hull after this summer. I'd like to flip my boat over for sanding but I'm not sure how I am gonna do this. If anyone out there has any suggestions I would be happy to get feedback on..
Marty, with my boat there is a printout of directions to shim the centerboard trunk to take out "centerboard slop." It states that one should put the boat on grass or a blanket and push to its side using the mast (stepped, obviously) as a giant lever. A helper or a block is placed on it to hold it down. Sound a little nuts but that may expose enough of the bottom to sand/paint one side then then other.

I also have a trailex trailer.

I also have a trailex trailer. I also could not believe that it was so easy to launch and retrieve with the wheels so far from the water. The boat sits low and trails great. The only caveat would be that the back of my trailer sometimes scrapes the lawn a little as I back it down hill into its parking space. So you want the hitch end nice and low so that the back end does not scrape on uneven ground. Jim Dinneen

If you plan to trailer distances with the aluminum trailer get f

If you plan to trailer distances with the aluminum trailer get feedback from those with 10,000 plus miles on them. Several, including two district governors, have difficulty keeping tires on the aluminum trailers. A set of tires is replaced each year - and hope not to have a blow out in between. The center tread of the tires rip off. Axles have been replacemed and axle realignments, and still the treads separate from tires while trailering down the interstate. The knuckle joint on the back end of the axle spring assembly can get jammed in the "up" position during trailering, with a resultant loss of travel in that spring. To reset the knuckle joint the boats should be off loaded from the trailer and a big prybar used to reset the knuckle joint. Trying to pull a bottom cover on under the boat while it is on the trailer is risky. The trailer jack / wheel assembly can not be mounted on the centerline of the trailer, so the trailer ends up being quite twisted while it is jacked up, putting a big torque on the jack / wheel assembly that wears out it's pivot joint. The aluminum trailer weighs 10 pounds less than the galvanized trailer, so there is minimal if any gain in miles per gallon.