Prospective buyer

Please forward any comments you may have for a future owner. I'm considering FS or wet boats like the Laser. Here are a few specific questions to get things started: 1) Dry Sail or not? Is there a substantial benefit to dry sailing the Scot? Our Red Cross Sunfish fleet is dry sailed and the hulls still take on a lot of water. Does this happen in the FS, too? 2) Trailering. It has been said that you can tow a FS with most family sedans. What are they neglecting to mention? One owner I spoke with mentioned he had difficulty seeing around the boat without mirror extensions. (I own a Honda Civic Hybrid which is not up to the task of towing, so I would need to buy a vehicle for this purpose.) 3) Local conditions. Is there anyone who uses their Scot on Lake Pepin (upper Mississippi)? How does it do in those light wind days. Do you use an outboard? Are any of the marina's on Pepin navigable without a motor? 4) Racing rigged vs. cruising. I want a fast boat. Obviously the race rigged boat is going to be tuned for speed -- how substantial a benefit are we talking about? And, I may race it, but there seems to be very little racing on Pepin. (The Lake City fleet is small and mostly J-30s.) My main concern is I want to rock the worldview of any powerboaters I bring on board that may think my rig is "just a sailboat."

Comments

I am also considering buying a Flying Scot and this thread has b

I am also considering buying a Flying Scot and this thread has been helpful. I’ve been looking hard for a lightly sailed family package model (I’m told they’re better suited for single handed sailing than the racing models), but haven’t found an acceptable one, so I’m leaning toward buying new. While I’ve read that they hold their value better than other boats, it’s hard for me to commit to what I’ll spend for a new one [:0] when I see other used boats for sale outfitted for light cruising for less than half the price of a new F.S. Still, I’ve not found a boat that I think would better suit my skill level and provide the long-term enjoyment of improving my sailing while being relatively inexpensive to operate with low maintenance. Of course, by buying new, I can order exactly what I want and avoid all the shopping for--and carefully inspecting--a used boat. I’ve taken two local sailing classes and attended a four-day sailing school, plus lots of practice, mostly on Sunfish—a great way to learn, but at 54 I’m tired of the cramped cockpit, banged up legs and constantly sailing wet. While I live in the Columbus, Ohio area, my wife and I spend a lot of time over the summer at her mother’s at Lakeside, Ohio. I’m thinking of sailing on Sandusky Bay and, as conditions permit and my skills improve, Lake Erie. At this point, I’m not interested in racing. Do any of you have thoughts on my reservations and plans? Ben

First off, buying a sailboat is not unlike buying an automobile.

First off, buying a sailboat is not unlike buying an automobile. Neither is typically an "investment" but rather an expense. If you are like many individuals you wish to minimize this expense while at the same time not prostituting everything for the sake of a dollar. Purchasing a FS would be analogous to buying a high-end Honda or Toyota both of which are comfortable and responsive cars yet depreciate at a slower rate than other brands. Your belief that a family cruiser version of the FS is more suitable for single-handling is argueable. I am 63 and sail alone often on a race equipped Scot; I just don't employ the race goodies. You may find that a non-race equipped version may be priced a few dollars less. If you look long enough you will find a lightly used Scot for a fair price. One nice aspect of buying a used Scot (versus a used Honda or Toyota) is it is quite easy to determine the condition of the boat, everything is exposed! On the FSSA website you can refer to procedures for buying an FS with the most important scrutiny being the balsa core in the boat. Also look in your area for FS fleets or individual owners I guarantee they will help. I'm certainly not trying to discourage buying a new boat but armed with a little knowledge you will come across my mother's Honda Accord which literally was only driven to church on Sunday!!

BenBlee: If you do end up sailing in Columbus, OH, I can person

BenBlee: If you do end up sailing in Columbus, OH, I can personally highly recommend Hoover Sailing Club (www.hooversailingclub.com) as a good home base. I spent many years there. They have great organized sailing every week. Hoover is also home to several top level sailors who are always willing to help you get faster.
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[i]Originally posted by BenBlee[/i] [br]I am also considering buying a Flying Scot and this thread has been helpful. I’ve been looking hard for a lightly sailed family package model (I’m told they’re better suited for single handed sailing than the racing models), but haven’t found an acceptable one, so I’m leaning toward buying new. While I’ve read that they hold their value better than other boats, it’s hard for me to commit to what I’ll spend for a new one [:0] when I see other used boats for sale outfitted for light cruising for less than half the price of a new F.S. Still, I’ve not found a boat that I think would better suit my skill level and provide the long-term enjoyment of improving my sailing while being relatively inexpensive to operate with low maintenance. Of course, by buying new, I can order exactly what I want and avoid all the shopping for--and carefully inspecting--a used boat. I’ve taken two local sailing classes and attended a four-day sailing school, plus lots of practice, mostly on Sunfish—a great way to learn, but at 54 I’m tired of the cramped cockpit, banged up legs and constantly sailing wet. While I live in the Columbus, Ohio area, my wife and I spend a lot of time over the summer at her mother’s at Lakeside, Ohio. I’m thinking of sailing on Sandusky Bay and, as conditions permit and my skills improve, Lake Erie. At this point, I’m not interested in racing. Do any of you have thoughts on my reservations and plans? Ben

To gleninst and mad max, thanks for your replies.

To gleninst and mad max, thanks for your replies. I've talked with four members of the FS Fleet at Hoover Sailing Club near Columbus. They've been very helpful with sharing their experience and thoughts on the advantages and disadvantages of the various options. I feel better informed about my search for a used FS and hope to be joining FSSA and HSC in the near future.

That's great BenBlee.

That's great BenBlee. I think you'll really enjoy the HSC family.
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[i]Originally posted by BenBlee[/i] [br]To gleninst and mad max, thanks for your replies. I've talked with four members of the FS Fleet at Hoover Sailing Club near Columbus. They've been very helpful with sharing their experience and thoughts on the advantages and disadvantages of the various options. I feel better informed about my search for a used FS and hope to be joining FSSA and HSC in the near future.

BenBlee, I live in Columbus and sail on Sandusky Bay.

BenBlee, I live in Columbus and sail on Sandusky Bay. I have been a book student of the sport for a while and just bought my FS last year. What a blast! I have set my goal for sailing out of the bay and around Kelly's this year. (my wife says I need to launch from Lakeside, but we will debate that the day of my feat) Anyways, I bought the used FS1688, inexpensive, and have bought sails, through the forum, and plan on changing/adding some rigging, paint, etc. as time nad necessity presents itself. For real cheap, you can be sailing and for just as cheap you can make the boat suit what you want to do... FS1688 - Kyle

Thanks for replying, Kyle.

Thanks for replying, Kyle. I've been in touch with members of the F.S. Fleet at Hoover Sailing Club who've told me they think Sandusky Bay would be a great area to sail. They have an annual Lake Erie cruise from the Mazurik access, just west of Lakeside, around Kelly's Island with an overnight there, then return. I'm still shopping for a used FS and have a few possibilities. Having never owned a sailboat, I don't want take the plunge with the cost of a new one. I'll contact you off the forum as I'd like to hear more about your experience. Ben

I can't agree that new is always better than used.

I can't agree that new is always better than used. We all are trying to balance three resources: time, money, and energy. Purchasing a new Scot typically only saves time. If you don't live close to a dealer the effort to get a new Scot may be equal or more than finding a used one. As far as trouble after the sail goes, finding a boat cared for by a meticulous owner may be the best choice. Why? because you avoid infant mortality in the product. Who hasn't bought something new only to get it out of the box to find it not working. Admittedly, infant mortality should be low in a product like the Scot. But things can still go wrong... Swags can be bad, gelcoat can have defects, damage can occur in shipping. These problems will have been resolved by a meticulous owner. As far as money goes, new is nearly always the most expensive option. First year depreciation alone will pay for many a good used Scot. As for painting, with the new single and two part polyurethanes, I couldn't disagree more. First I find it easier to paint a boat than to buff out a boat, but that is because I have painted several boats. First timers will find it more difficult, but they can still get good results by rolling the paint on. I think it is worth the effort. Why? Because the result is so much better, and will last a lot longer. Moreover, a decent paint job will increase the value of the boat. Problems with peeling indicate poor preparation or poor paint. A good hard paint is less susceptible to scratches than gelcoat alone. Gouges in the paint also effect the gelcoat. Color matching in gelcoat is difficult because gelcoat changes color as it cures. Even pros are forced to trail and error. Leftover polyurethane has a long shelf life (unlike gelcoat) and will produce easy nearly imperceptible patches. Personally, I think the older fundamentally sound Scot is the best choice for my time, money, effort situation. It probably represents the least downside risk. Especially for the new sailor. Get in the boat and sail. If you hit a dock, so what! After a year or so, fix the cosmetics, or if you yearn for new gelcoat smell, go for it. You'll be less likely to mess up your new baby!
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[i]Originally posted by fs2929[/i] [br]N/A, The Scot is a great boat to move into. The Neff family did just that, moved up from a Catalina 22 to a Scot. The 22 is a great boat too, but we out grew it within a year. We eventally moved into a Catalina 27, but at the same time kept the Scot. We now have three Scot's in our family. New is always better than used. The buyer beware is just a disclaimer to avoid liability if a deal goes bad. You can certainly find a good boat on that list, but certainly look at it first. Painting a boat is nice for a year or two. Then you get a few scratches and the paint eventually peals making it look worse than it started. A little elbow grease, light wet sanding and polishing of old gelcoat is my recommendation. Dan Neff www.flyingscotracing.com
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[i]Originally posted by n/a[/i] [br]This has been an excellent thread! I, too, am a prospective Scot buyer. My wife and I bought a Catalina 22 a few years back and enjoyed it but I would like something smaller and (I hope) more responsive to the light air often found during the hot and steamy summers here on Alabama inland lakes. Also, we want to trailer it to the bays and sounds on the Gulf Coast. Might the Scot be the boat? One reason for considering a Scot (along with the Wayfarer and Daysailer) is its reputation for stability. I want something fun and challenging and to dabble in club racing...my wife wants something stable and dry. I do have some questions I hope someone can help me with: Has anyone ever painted their FS (hull and/or deck) and if so, how did it turn out and was it durable over several seasons? This is surely a subjective question; but, is buying a new Scot "worth it" when such good ones seem to be available on the market? Lastly, is it "safe" to buy a Scot from fleet websites, Ebay, etc.? I ask partly because the fssa.com site itself calls its classifieds page the "caveat emptor (buyer beware)" page! Thanks again for such a great forum; it's a big help to those of us considering a Flying Scot!

I've located a Flying Scot near my home that appears to be sound

I've located a Flying Scot near my home that appears to be sound. It's a Douglas built from about 1972. I want to make a detailed inspection before committing to buy, but I noted a couple of things (and I've read about them elsewhere in the forum). First, there are a number of what appear to be cosmetic scratches and chips, but there is no sign of delamination or core damage. Worst of the scratches are along the port side where the boat was left by a previous owner without fenders along a dock. Second, the mast was apparantly stressed, probably during raising or lowering as the's a small vertical crack along the side at the base. The seller thinks I could have that welded (don't know anything about welding aluminum), but I also noticed that some have bought a mast sleeve. Otherwise, the hull, hardware and sails appear to be in fairly good condition for its age. If I buy, I intend to use this as my "trainer" or starter boat as I've never owned a sailboat before. Anyone have thoughts or advice? Ben

I'm a prospective buyer of the Flying Scot.

I'm a prospective buyer of the Flying Scot. I've been admiring the boats from afar for probably 10 years, and now may be ready to make a purchase. From the group's perspective, how important is the ready accessability of a fleet? Is the attractiveness of the boat much improved by the sharing of ideas with other like minded folks? What percentage of Scot sailors regularly sail with a fleet?

quote:[i]Originally posted by Dherzfeld[/i] [br]I'm a prospecti

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[i]Originally posted by Dherzfeld[/i] [br]I'm a prospective buyer of the Flying Scot. I've been admiring the boats from afar for probably 10 years, and now may be ready to make a purchase. From the group's perspective, how important is the ready accessability of a fleet? Is the attractiveness of the boat much improved by the sharing of ideas with other like minded folks? What percentage of Scot sailors regularly sail with a fleet?
It really depends on what kind of sailing you are planing to do (racing vs. cruising). With racing it's nice to have a local fleet as you can practice with them, get tips, etc. If you are just cruising then it's not that significant. You could always go to a fleet at some other part of the country and make vacation there and hook up with them and get tips. We don't have a fleet anywhere near us. I kind of miss it as we enjoy racing occasionally. We do try to go to some of the races like the Wife & Husband or Midwest Districts. Our main handicap with that are our kids, especially having a newborn this year. But that's the same issue with any other boat class. When we got our boat we decided to take a week long vacation at Midwest Sailing - Portage Yacht Club in order to take Flying Scot specific lessons. We really enjoyed it and got to stay in their cabin right next to the dock. It's something I would recommend anybody that wants to get more comfortable with their boat. It doesn't necessarily have to be MS/PYC. In general we just sail back and forth on our lake and enjoy ourselves. No need for a fleet for that. Having our dry dock space by the lake is nice though, as we don't have to trailer our boat and rig the mast every time. And if you want to connect with other FS sailors on occasion I recommend going to a race here or there. It's a lot of fun even when your not an expert.

Claus FS5074 Ames, IA