Cruising the Scot

If there are other cruising people out there, let's fill up this topic. I would like to chat with folks about sail camping and sleeping aboard the Scot. I am planning two cruises this summer and need all the ideas I can get. Has anyone set-up their boat with the roller furling jib? How about lights on the Scot? I have a mast-head "at anchor" light. I'd be glad to share the design.

Comments

Marty: I would be interested in the anchor light design.

Marty: I would be interested in the anchor light design. I installed a battery under the afterdeck and a plug for my trolling motor next to the motor mount. It's simple to use the motor when leaving my crowded anchorage and then unplug and stow it when underway. Now that I have electricity I will be installing lights. Practical Sailor recently did a good survey of roller reefing units. If you don't subscribe you may get the results from their web page. I agree that we should use this forum to actively encourage cruisers.

My anchor light is a battery powered (self contained) , 4 AA's,

My anchor light is a battery powered (self contained) , 4 AA's, that was purchased as a clamp-on stern light. I have addapted it with lugs to be hoisted up the mast by the main halyard. It extends above the mast head by several inches. It also has a photo electric switch so that it comes on at dark etc. I will be glad to send pics if anyone is interested.

FS Inc.

FS Inc. offers a roller furling set-up. I wonder if anyone has used that one.

Have you added special storage compartments to your boat ? How d

Have you added special storage compartments to your boat ? How does a porta potti stow and where is it placed for use? (my wife wants to know that one). Do you use a boom tent? Where do you sleep? Regards.

Bruce: For storage on board I use four laundry baskets that wor

Bruce: For storage on board I use four laundry baskets that work well, two forward and two aft. I have a few dry bags for stuff that needs to stay dry. The motor stows between the two aft baskets. I screwed a few brackets to the underside of the foredeck to hold a paddle out of the way. The Porta-Potti sounds like a tough one, unless your wife is really small and can fit under the deck. I use a red bucket when its inconvenient to pee over the side. I had children on board who used towels to make area under the foredeck a private play area. The boat cover made to be used when mooring makes a tent, especially if you put mosquito netting across the open back end. I have one made by the "Sailors Tailor" and it is one rugged sucker. I'd like to hear how folks have designed sleeping arrangements. I'm thinking of panels laid across the seats to form a plarform for an air mattress.

I did a fair amount of short-week cruising in Hawaii on a Lightn

I did a fair amount of short-week cruising in Hawaii on a Lightning (very similar cruising characteristics). My wife and I went very low tech: no electric, hand-held marine radio (in water-proof pouch), 3.5 hp outboard, bucket with roped handle for emergency toilet. I rigged a topping lift for a boom tent (boom rigged to lift 30 degrees and with spinnaker pole lashed to aft end) for lounging in the shaded cockpit at anchor. Anchor lights were glow sticks (though we usually anchored within the reef so close ashore that no other boats came near). We carried a dome tent and slept and cooked ashore. We carried most gear in Tupperware-type bins, which protected the contents when we waded ashore. All-in-all, we had much more fun cruising the open boat than we had cruising my previous Hawaii boat -- a 24-foot pocket cruiser. More time sailing and less time fussing with boat stuff.

Couple of questions about Hawaii cruising: Which island were you

Couple of questions about Hawaii cruising: Which island were you on? Was the boat there, or did you ship it to the island? Did you moor it or keep it on a trailer? What type of anchor did you use? I am considering a job offer on Oahu and can't imagine not taking my Scot if I choose to go, so would appreciate the above information. Thanks, Bob

Hey Bob, I lived 8+ years in Kailua-Kona on the Big Island.

Hey Bob, I lived 8+ years in Kailua-Kona on the Big Island. I bought the boat there (one of two that I bought). You can ship your boat, but unless you slide it into a very large container with household goods, the cost may dissuade you. On the flip side, Hawaii isn't exactly a mecca for used boats (though Oahu has more than any of the other islands). I kept the Lightning on a trailer at the local sailing club, mast up and ready to go. I also had a Yankee Dolphin 24 that at different times was moored in Kailua Bay (Kona) and then on a trailer at the sailing club. (Trailer maintenance is a big deal.) I used Danforth anchors with 10-15 feet of chain (coral head protection). In Kona, you are either anchoring in 80 feet or 6-20 feet, so it's not unusual to anchor with only 3-1 scope. The nice thing is that the water is usually clear and warm, so you can see how the anchor is set (I usually hand set it when in 20-foot-or-less). As for sailing, the Tradewinds are fantastic for Lightnings (and I assume Scots) -- strong, but not gusty. Dan

I use 2 7ft x 2 ft plywood panels laid next to the centerboard t

I use 2 7ft x 2 ft plywood panels laid next to the centerboard trunk on a couple of 2x4 risers screwed to the edge to 'flatten' the cockpit floor ( I throw them in and use them in place while sailing), and sleep in a bag with a self-inflating air mattress (the thin ones, quite comfortable) under the bag. Boom tent is mandantory. A small Kenyon canned butane fuel stove, and a solar shower, couple of 5 gallon soft plastic water jugs. I anchor in shallow water so often that I don't use an anchor light, but I carry a battery-powered 360 degree light on a pole hoisted on the main halyard if necessary. Running lights are battery powered LED sunction cup units, they stay put and are exceptionally bright, made by AquaSignal. Bugs are hard in Core Sound in North Carolina, so netting is also a must. Coolers are under the aft deck and forward. Two cheap folding chairs are great for getting out of the cockpit and sitting and the fore or aft deck for the sunset constitutional. The Scot is a great cruiser, I've carried loads of gear and gunkholed many spots not reachable by most other small boats!

Is the rear deck actually strong enough to place two deck chairs

Is the rear deck actually strong enough to place two deck chairs on ? I recently bought a 21 year old Scot and am treating her like a baby, what is the "spec" for weight on the aft deck. Thanks. FS-3685.

Barry: You sound like a role model for cruising the Scot.

Barry: You sound like a role model for cruising the Scot. What do you use for the boom tent? I use the suction cup running lights, too. So far, I haven't swept them from the deck with a line. Where in N.C. do you cruise? I just returned from a week of driving from Wilmington to Oriental and saw outstanding cruising grounds for a shallow-draft boat.

PF, I don't know of any specs for the decks, I would suggest tha

PF, I don't know of any specs for the decks, I would suggest that if they don't flex when walked on have at it. I have had up to 4 standing or sitting on the decks with no probs. My boat was built in '61, and the decks are still tight and sound. Biggest ket to the Scot is having fun with it!

Bob, I used some sunbrella I got from a gent in NJ for 8 bucks a

Bob, I used some sunbrella I got from a gent in NJ for 8 bucks a yard, sewn at the edges and reinforced where necessary. It rides the boom, but is cut to allow the boom to be hauled up past horizontal for more headroom, and is fastened with Quik-clips (adjustable) to the rail pad-eyes. Velcro is under the edge for bug screen that drops to the deck with a sand-filled soft plastic tube sewn on the bottom to keep it on the deck, works ok as long as it doesn't blow harder than 25+. I live in Beaufort, and cruise Cape Lookout, Core Sound, Bogue Sound. Tons of gunkholing sailing, much of it shallow. Favorite spots are the Cape hook, and Nelson Bay/Cedar Island area, although Shackleford Banks are close and quiet from Oct through May. The Neuse River from Oriental around Cedar Island to Beaufort is a great long weekend cruise. I would definitely suggest getting a couple of reef cringles installed in an old mains'l for cruising, temporarily tie some reefing lines for quick shortening. It's a lot easier on the bum to not have to be dancing on the rail when the breeze kicks up and you have to pound the last few miles to the selected anchorage, as the roller boom furling does away with the mid-sheet block. Nothing beats a relaxed forearm for gripping that first cold beer! Cheers!

Barry, you are either a Flying Scot cruising inspiration or you'

Barry, you are either a Flying Scot cruising inspiration or you're just completely out of control!!! ;) In the coming months, I fully expect to hear how you have turned your Flying Scot into a skippered charter vessel. In the meantime, I'm going to Kmart to buy some of those deck chairs. Cheers to you.

IsleTales, Thanks for the compliment, but those that know me wou

IsleTales, Thanks for the compliment, but those that know me would lean heavily toward the "out of control" description...chuckle. I have had as many as 8 friends out on 277 for day cruises to the Banks, but I find that more than 3 and the beer disappears quickly. Seems if I can't put a line in their hand it's in the cooler. The chairs are great, but try to find ones that have soft rubber feet on them. My first ones were hard plastic, and an unnoticed boat wake rolled me right off the port quarter. After that dunking I glued small pieces of TreadMaster ( a soft rubber decking nonskid material) to the feet and the skidding into the drink was a past episode. I keep mine in their bags up under the cockpit seats held in place by two lines under each seat that are secured to the seat reinforcement tabbing. Keeps them out from under feet, and I store my paddles there too. It also helps to lower the centerboard as much as the depth will allow when anchored, eases the movement and is more stable. A couple of cedar shims or large paint sticks will help reduce the board 'clunk' when anchored too. Happy cruising!

Hey, Yes I cruise my scot.

Hey, Yes I cruise my scot. I thought I was the only one who did. Glad to find you folks. I have done some mods to my scot. I rigged rope halyards, got rid of the wires. I am in the process of making a tent for over night stays. I have camped off the scot but want to stay onboard. Any body know how to get the tent to hook to the boat? Wayne 2903

Hello, I just joined the fourm.

Hello, I just joined the fourm.. . it looks good! I'm refurbishing an elderly scot (#2217) and plan to camp cruise. I'm concerned about the lack of self-rescue ability in the Scot, and am thinking about adding additional flotation, in the form of styrofoan blocks under the side decks and possibly under some wooden floorboards that I may install. Any thoughts about other ways to make the boat safer by making it self-rescueing would be appreciated. Thanks, and glad to be here. Joe C.

Welcome Joe: I can't say that I've heard of any complaints about

Welcome Joe: I can't say that I've heard of any complaints about the Scot's degree of flotation. I'm sure you've seen the posts on masthead flotation, in my humble opinion, one of the best ways to prevent disaster in a capsize. I could be delusional, but it seems to me that the balsa core of the boat also provides flotation. If you contact Harry Carpenter at the Flying Scot factory I'm certain that he could put your mind at ease on the subject of adequate flotation. BTW: As I've been refurbishing my old Scot I found that one of the fiberglass straps holding one of the foam billets in place had separated from the underside of the deck. It was a simple matter to reattach it with resin and mat. I hope these pages are a resource to you as you work on your boat.

Regarding self rescuing ability.

Regarding self rescuing ability. I've been told by a couple of friends from my local sailing club who used to own Scots that although the boat will not sink because of the balsa core and the side deck flotation, if swamped it will float so low in the water that it can't be bailed out- the water comes in over the deck and the centerboard case. Some FS owners install a port in the stern so that, I'm told, water will exit as the boat is being towed back to the dock by a rescue boat after a swamping. Clearly, getting swamped like this would be a disaster during a cruise. I have wondered if adding more flotation would make the boat float higher, or prevent as much water entering it in the first place, and prevent this problem. Has anyone else heard of this, or found a remedy? Thanks JC

JC, although not being an expert on this subject I think that th

JC, although not being an expert on this subject I think that the additional flotation would have to be placed as low as possible so that it’s in the way of the crew or takes away storage space. Instead of doing that I would go with the mast head flotation. That will prevent that the boat swamps in the first place. This also could save your gear since the boat won’t flip upside down. Do we have some volunteers to do some turtle, swamp, and mast head flotation tests? I bet we all would be interested in these result but most of us are to chicken to do that. ;)
Claus FS5074 Ames, IA |

Also keep in mind that there is such a thing as too much flotati

Also keep in mind that there is such a thing as too much flotation. While it's very disheartening to have your FS half filled with water, this partial sinking (and squatting down in the water) does inhibit the tendency to continue the roll. I've sailed on small boats with very high flotation (ie, once you righted them, they were practically dry). This has obvious benefits, but the downside is that once the boat is on it's side, it floats so high that it exerts downward pressure on the mast tip. This happens very quickly and before you know it, you "thumbtack" the mast into the bottom.

Hello, We just purchased a factory reconditioned FS #1210.

Hello, We just purchased a factory reconditioned FS #1210. We're retired and intend to primarily day sail, with some camp cruising too. We ordered the boom tent, topping lift, motor mount, jeffy reefing and rudder lift system. Once we get the boat home, we plan to outfit it for cruising. We have used a 5 gallon bucket with fitted toilet seat and dry bags in the past, so we'll see if we can make it work on our FS. We have a small danforth and a grapnel which we can alternate with our 100' anchor line. We will be cruising waters with both rocky and sandy/mud bottoms. We hope to fit two self-inflating mattresses aft with our feet facing the stern. If this proves to be too cramped, then we will explore the idea of briding the area between the centerboard trunk and seats. We will use the Signal LED navigation lights/suction cup, but I plan to run a small line to secure them in the event they come loose. We have a Mercury 2.5hp four stroke motor which should be plenty of motor. We will cruise the boat under jib and main sails only. We may rig a whisker pole for the jib? I'm not sure a roller furling is needed for this small jib, so we'll work without one and see. There is plenty of room for all our gear from what I can see. It's a matter of storing it out of the way and secured; that's what bungie cords and velcro are good for. We're retired so this should be great fun. I have owned a Montgomery 17 and SeaPearl 21; I already know the FS is a better boat for our needs. We will post our experiences and modifications accordingly. We will first sail on Guntersville Lake in AL, but plan to head for the Choctawhatchee Bay and ICW towards Pensacola this summer. The idea is to adhere to the KISS approach. John and Joy

I too have flotation concerns.

I too have flotation concerns. Last summer after a turtle during a sudden storm our hull was completely full of water and on righting the cockpit was submerged several inches below the water. Bailing in these circumstances was not an option. Only after a tow back to harbor and pulling part way onto the trailer was I able to begin emptying the cockpit. Since then I always use mast flotation if there's any weather question ( or not a safety boat available) I've also installed the suggested bow bag flotation. I still have concerns about self rescue- would the bow bag raise the cockpit high enough in the water to begin baling? I'm considering additional flotation under the aft deck. From experience I'll tell you self rescue from a turtle would be near impossible ( maybe in calm weather conditions, with 2 real heavy guys) Mark

Hello Barry, I'm a first time FS owner.

Hello Barry, I'm a first time FS owner. We hope to camp cruise and sleep aboard our FS 1210. Can you email me photos of your plywood panels, how they fit and all that jazz? mayrel@centurylink.net Early thanks...John
quote:
[i]Originally posted by Barry277[/i] [br]I use 2 7ft x 2 ft plywood panels laid next to the centerboard trunk on a couple of 2x4 risers screwed to the edge to 'flatten' the cockpit floor ( I throw them in and use them in place while sailing), and sleep in a bag with a self-inflating air mattress (the thin ones, quite comfortable) under the bag. Boom tent is mandantory. A small Kenyon canned butane fuel stove, and a solar shower, couple of 5 gallon soft plastic water jugs. I anchor in shallow water so often that I don't use an anchor light, but I carry a battery-powered 360 degree light on a pole hoisted on the main halyard if necessary. Running lights are battery powered LED sunction cup units, they stay put and are exceptionally bright, made by AquaSignal. Bugs are hard in Core Sound in North Carolina, so netting is also a must. Coolers are under the aft deck and forward. Two cheap folding chairs are great for getting out of the cockpit and sitting and the fore or aft deck for the sunset constitutional. The Scot is a great cruiser, I've carried loads of gear and gunkholed many spots not reachable by most other small boats!

It's great to see Barry277 back on the forum.

It's great to see Barry277 back on the forum. Barry, you gave my husband and me lots of advice before we cruised FS 2302 on Core Sound back in 2005. At that time, we took along a tent and camped on Cape Lookout National Seashore. After that I made a tent that we use with the boom raised. We use the main halyard as a topping lift on the aft end of the boom and the spinnaker pole topping lift to hold fore end of boom higher on the mast track. (We bought an extra slide for this.) We use five plywood panels laid across the seats and trunk for a bed. "Portapotty" is a bucket with WagBags. We've cruised SC Low Country, Pine Island Sound (Sanibel and Captiva in Florida) and the Ten Thousand Islands off the Everglades. If you have enough patience, check out photos at www.barneyandlee.shutterfly.com.
quote:
[i]Originally posted by John Merrell[/i] [br]Hello Barry, I'm a first time FS owner. We hope to camp cruise and sleep aboard our FS 1210. Can you email me photos of your plywood panels, how they fit and all that jazz? mayrel@centurylink.net Early thanks...John
quote:
[i]Originally posted by Barry277[/i] [br]I use 2 7ft x 2 ft plywood panels laid next to the centerboard trunk on a couple of 2x4 risers screwed to the edge to 'flatten' the cockpit floor ( I throw them in and use them in place while sailing), and sleep in a bag with a self-inflating air mattress (the thin ones, quite comfortable) under the bag. Boom tent is mandantory. A small Kenyon canned butane fuel stove, and a solar shower, couple of 5 gallon soft plastic water jugs. I anchor in shallow water so often that I don't use an anchor light, but I carry a battery-powered 360 degree light on a pole hoisted on the main halyard if necessary. Running lights are battery powered LED sunction cup units, they stay put and are exceptionally bright, made by AquaSignal. Bugs are hard in Core Sound in North Carolina, so netting is also a must. Coolers are under the aft deck and forward. Two cheap folding chairs are great for getting out of the cockpit and sitting and the fore or aft deck for the sunset constitutional. The Scot is a great cruiser, I've carried loads of gear and gunkholed many spots not reachable by most other small boats!

That tent is pretty slick.

That tent is pretty slick. Is it off the shelf? If so what's the name of the manufacturer and the name of the model? Thanks, Jim Richards
quote:
[i]Originally posted by Lee Sokol[/i] [br]It's great to see Barry277 back on the forum. Barry, you gave my husband and me lots of advice before we cruised FS 2302 on Core Sound back in 2005. At that time, we took along a tent and camped on Cape Lookout National Seashore. After that I made a tent that we use with the boom raised. We use the main halyard as a topping lift on the aft end of the boom and the spinnaker pole topping lift to hold fore end of boom higher on the mast track. (We bought an extra slide for this.) We use five plywood panels laid across the seats and trunk for a bed. "Portapotty" is a bucket with WagBags. We've cruised SC Low Country, Pine Island Sound (Sanibel and Captiva in Florida) and the Ten Thousand Islands off the Everglades. If you have enough patience, check out photos at www.barneyandlee.shutterfly.com.
quote:
[i]Originally posted by John Merrell[/i] [br]Hello Barry, I'm a first time FS owner. We hope to camp cruise and sleep aboard our FS 1210. Can you email me photos of your plywood panels, how they fit and all that jazz? mayrel@centurylink.net Early thanks...John
quote:
[i]Originally posted by Barry277[/i] [br]I use 2 7ft x 2 ft plywood panels laid next to the centerboard trunk on a couple of 2x4 risers screwed to the edge to 'flatten' the cockpit floor ( I throw them in and use them in place while sailing), and sleep in a bag with a self-inflating air mattress (the thin ones, quite comfortable) under the bag. Boom tent is mandantory. A small Kenyon canned butane fuel stove, and a solar shower, couple of 5 gallon soft plastic water jugs. I anchor in shallow water so often that I don't use an anchor light, but I carry a battery-powered 360 degree light on a pole hoisted on the main halyard if necessary. Running lights are battery powered LED sunction cup units, they stay put and are exceptionally bright, made by AquaSignal. Bugs are hard in Core Sound in North Carolina, so netting is also a must. Coolers are under the aft deck and forward. Two cheap folding chairs are great for getting out of the cockpit and sitting and the fore or aft deck for the sunset constitutional. The Scot is a great cruiser, I've carried loads of gear and gunkholed many spots not reachable by most other small boats!


Unfortunately, it's not off the shelf.

Unfortunately, it's not off the shelf. I designed it and made it. If you look closely, it's basically a conestoga wagon with "doors" on the ends. The three poles are collapsible tent poles from our backpacking tent. They fit into small rings attached to the deck just above the gunwales. The tent is made of mosquito netting and silicone impregnated ripstop nylon. I bought all the materials from www.seattlefabrics.com. A great book on the topic is Dinghy Cruising by Margaret Dye.
quote:
[i]Originally posted by phebejim[/i] [br]That tent is pretty slick. Is it off the shelf? If so what's the name of the manufacturer and the name of the model? Thanks, Jim Richards
quote:
[i]Originally posted by Lee Sokol[/i] [br]It's great to see Barry277 back on the forum. Barry, you gave my husband and me lots of advice before we cruised FS 2302 on Core Sound back in 2005. At that time, we took along a tent and camped on Cape Lookout National Seashore. After that I made a tent that we use with the boom raised. We use the main halyard as a topping lift on the aft end of the boom and the spinnaker pole topping lift to hold fore end of boom higher on the mast track. (We bought an extra slide for this.) We use five plywood panels laid across the seats and trunk for a bed. "Portapotty" is a bucket with WagBags. We've cruised SC Low Country, Pine Island Sound (Sanibel and Captiva in Florida) and the Ten Thousand Islands off the Everglades. If you have enough patience, check out photos at www.barneyandlee.shutterfly.com.
quote:
[i]Originally posted by John Merrell[/i] [br]Hello Barry, I'm a first time FS owner. We hope to camp cruise and sleep aboard our FS 1210. Can you email me photos of your plywood panels, how they fit and all that jazz? mayrel@centurylink.net Early thanks...John
quote:
[i]Originally posted by Barry277[/i] [br]I use 2 7ft x 2 ft plywood panels laid next to the centerboard trunk on a couple of 2x4 risers screwed to the edge to 'flatten' the cockpit floor ( I throw them in and use them in place while sailing), and sleep in a bag with a self-inflating air mattress (the thin ones, quite comfortable) under the bag. Boom tent is mandantory. A small Kenyon canned butane fuel stove, and a solar shower, couple of 5 gallon soft plastic water jugs. I anchor in shallow water so often that I don't use an anchor light, but I carry a battery-powered 360 degree light on a pole hoisted on the main halyard if necessary. Running lights are battery powered LED sunction cup units, they stay put and are exceptionally bright, made by AquaSignal. Bugs are hard in Core Sound in North Carolina, so netting is also a must. Coolers are under the aft deck and forward. Two cheap folding chairs are great for getting out of the cockpit and sitting and the fore or aft deck for the sunset constitutional. The Scot is a great cruiser, I've carried loads of gear and gunkholed many spots not reachable by most other small boats!



Lee, how's the tent holding up in rain or wind? Claus FS5074

Lee, how's the tent holding up in rain or wind?

Claus FS5074 Seaweed Ames, IA

It holds up fairly well.

It holds up fairly well. We've gotten slightly wet in a blowing wind, but never soaked. The key is in making sure the side flaps are fastened tightly when lowered. I put grommets in the flaps and run a thin cord through them so they raise and lower kind of like Roman shades. They fasten in place with little plastic toggle clips like you see on stuff sacks.
quote:
[i]Originally posted by Claus[/i] [br]Lee, how's the tent holding up in rain or wind?

Claus FS5074 Seaweed Ames, IA